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Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender

Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’

Postby smix » Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:11 pm

Mayor Pete Buttigieg: ‘Think of Something Really Gay — That’s How Gay I Am’
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... -gay-i-am/
Category: Politics
Published: April 19, 2019

Description: Mayor Pete Buttigieg acknowledged that he would face challenges as an openly gay presidential candidate if he ultimately faced President Donald Trump in the general election.

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“I’m from Indiana, I’m gay as a — I don’t know, think of something really gay — that’s how gay I am,” he said in an interview with TMZ’s Harvey Levin. Levin warned Buttigieg that Trump campaign would most certainly turn homophobic. “I’m used to bullying,” Buttigieg replied. “I think you confront it, initially, and move on.” He said that as a presidential candidate he would focus on calling out Trump’s behavior but remain intent on changing the subject to his own agenda. Buttigieg quoted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. saying that “darkness cannot drive out darkness. Only light can do that.” Levin, who is also gay, asked Buttigieg if he was worried that his homosexuality would be a “dealbreaker” for many Americans. “You know, there are some people that I’m never going to get, and that just is what it is, that’s how it always is in some way shape or form in politics,” he replied. Buttigieg said that he was encouraged after Indiana citizens rose up to condemn the religious freedom law signed by then-governor Mike Pence. “I don’t care how conservative you are, how religious you are, if you realize that someone is coming to harm because of something you believe, something you used to believe was right, it’s going to open up your heart at least a little bit to change,” he said. He said that it was important to “call” Americans to the “right side of history” and encourage them towards more progressive policies, rather than be accusatory or demanding about what they should think or say. Buttigieg said that Americans became more tolerant of gay lifestyles as they grew to know them personally. He said that he considered himself pretty physically fit, but admitted that he was tempted a lot by unhealthy campaign food on the trail. He acknowledged that his Instagram was full of unhealthy food. “The things that you can deep fry…” he said, pointing to food found at local fairs. Buttigieg told TMZ he was not worried by his husband Chasten’s prolific use of social media despite his presidential run. He admitted that sometimes they drafted angry tweets together to get it off their chests, but would never send them. “He’s pretty good at running stuff by me, and I’ll run stuff by him for a gut check too,” he said.



MAD Magazine Mocks Pete Buttigieg for Failing to Recognize Alfred E. Neuman
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... es-to-war/
Category: Politics
Published: May 12, 2019

Description: MAD magazine has declared war on Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg after he slighted the humorous publication on Friday, saying he did not recognize the iconic “Alfred E. Neuman” character and that he had to look it up on Google.

buttigieg-alfred-e-neuman.jpg

President Donald Trump compared Buttigieg to Alfred E. Neuman in an interview with Politico published Friday, saying: “Alfred E. Neuman cannot become president of the United States.” When asked to respond to the insult, Buttigieg replied: “I’ll be honest. I had to Google that. I guess it’s just a generational thing. I didn’t get the reference.” In response, MAD — which has hardly shied away from mocking Trump — took on Buttigieg directly, tweeting:
Who’s Pete Buttigieg? Must be a generational thing.
— MAD Magazine (@MADmagazine) May 11, 2019

In addition, the magazine retweeted a critic of Buttigieg (and Trump):
I’m 37, I grew up reading Mad Magazine and buying it (cheap!) At the newsstands. It’s not a generational thing, Mayor Pete just somehow missed a major cultural landmark of the last 50 years. And Trump is an idiot.
— Zach D Roberts (@zdroberts) May 11, 2019

The magazine also changed its Twitter profile, describing itself as: “Historic comedy institution with Mayor Pete on the cover.” Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has found traction in Silicon Valley, where Alfred E. Neuman is likely quite familiar among the tech community as a comic brand. Politico noted that then-candidate Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) referred to Alfred E. Neuman in poking fun at his own appearance in a speech at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner in New York during the 2008 presidential election: “There is no other crowd in America that I’d rather be palling around with right now,” he said. “It is often said that I share the politics of Alfred E. Smith and the ears of Alfred E. Neuman.”

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By insulting MAD to target Trump, Buttigieg risks a fight with a popular satirical publication — never a place an aspiring candidate in a crowded field of competitors wants to be. Trump tends to use nicknames and insults to ridicule his opponents — often experimenting with different versions before settling on one for each adversary. For example, he began referring to former Vice President Joe Biden as “Sleepy Joe,” though he modified that last week to “SleepyCreepy Joe” in a tweet about Biden’s high poll numbers.



Pete Buttigieg: ‘I’m Not out to Be President of Gay America’
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... y-america/
Category: Politics
Published: September 6, 2019

Description: Mayor Pete Buttigieg addressed his homosexuality on Friday, as he continued his campaign for president. “I’m not out to be president of gay America, I’m out to be president of the United States of America,” he said. “But it’s part of who I am.”

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The South Bend mayor discussed his sexuality in an interview with hip-hop radio show, “The Breakfast Club” in New York City. Buttigieg said it was important to have conversations about his gay identity, but specified he did not want it to be the only conversation about his campaign. “The fact that I belong to a group that has been impacted by hate does affect the way I understand the world,” he said. Buttigieg said he viewed himself as being in a “marriage” with his husband just like anyone else, not just a “gay marriage.” As a married couple in South Bend Indiana, he explained he and his husband Chasten discussed how to present themselves to the public. “We found that we could just act like any other couple, invite other people to treat us that way, and for the most part they did,” he said. “We weren’t blind to the fact that it was a big deal for other people.” He said that it was important for Americans to have conversations about gay relationships and gay identities. “We can’t pretend that this isn’t a thing, it’s just to make sure we have a way of going through life to where it’s not the only thing,” he said.

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Buttigieg criticized people like comedian Kevin Hart who told gay singer Lil Nas X that it did not matter to him that he was gay. “I will say that I think a lot of gay people hear that and hear something that might not be that different than what some folks here when they hear somebody say that I don’t see color,” he said.
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Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'

Postby smix » Sat Apr 20, 2019 9:00 pm

Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... -of-people
Category: Politics
Published: April 16, 2019

Description: Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg said Tuesday that he believes socialism is gaining popularity because "capitalism has let a lot of people down." "I think the reason we're having this argument over socialism and capitalism is that capitalism has let a lot of people down," the mayor of South Bend, Ind., said on CNN's "New Day." He also said that he believes in "democratic capitalism" and reiterated his comments that democracy is more important than capitalism. "At the end of the day, we prioritize democracy," he said. "And having that framework of a rule of law, of fairness, is actually what it takes for markets to work." Buttigieg told CNN that he is "open to" embracing a proposal by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who is also running for president, to put a new tax on large companies. "I'm open to that," he said. "I think the more interesting issue is, should our policies be any different toward the biggest companies than they are toward the smallest ones?" When he was questioned on whether he would break up large corporations, he said "sometimes, if there's anti-competitive behavior. "It's not just about saying, 'If you're this big, we're going to break you.' It's also, perhaps, the bigger you are, the more responsibility you have," he added. Buttigieg, who officially joined the race at a Sunday campaign launch, is among more than a dozen candidates competing for the Democratic Party's 2020 presidential nomination and being questioned about socialism. Once seen as a long-shot candidate, Buttigieg in recent weeks has received significant media attention and a bump in the polls. His rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), is a self-described democratic socialist.



'Mayor Pete, the centrist rockstar' is only a liberal fantasy
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/43 ... al-fantasy
Category: Politics
Published: April 12, 2019

Description: Pete Buttigieg, the youthful, charismatic mayor of South Bend, Ind., is not the centrist rockstar that mainstream media are trying to portray him to be. On the contrary, Buttigieg actually is a socialist hypocrite. On paper, Buttigieg has a quirky jumble of virtues that are designed to appeal, however paradoxically, to all of 2019 America’s deeply divided sectors. He’s a committed and unapologetic liberal, who nevertheless slams “social justice warriors.” He’s openly gay and married to a man, but a practicing Christian who quotes Scripture as readily as he does G.K. Chesterton. He’s a white man who sticks to his small town, Midwestern roots, but also a Rhodes Scholar and Harvard-educated cosmopolitan who speaks eight languages. He’s a peacenik whose Harvard thesis endorsed Catholic novelist Graham Greene’s critique of American interventionism, but he also volunteered to go to Afghanistan as a military intelligence officer. In reality, “Mayor Pete” is just executing a well-crafted pantomime of the ultimate representation of a common ground that doesn’t actually exist in America. Buttigieg’s centrism and moderation, to put it bluntly, is an act only liberals could think stands up to even the most cursory investigation. As his presidential “exploration” turns to a near-certain campaign, Buttigieg has been forced to give form to his nebulous appeal. Therein lies his problem. As we’re quickly seeing, he offers nothing different than the typical coastal liberals and neosocialist progressives he’s competing against for the Democratic nomination. Take Buttigieg’s appeals to Christian conservatives, for example. As soon as he’s put under even the friendliest of microscopes, such as in puff interviews with CNN and NBC, the wheels start to come off. To the extent that he’s prepared to bring religion into the political mix, he vigorously supports the same anti-Christian policy agenda that has been promoted for years by the furthest fringes of the atheist left. Late-term abortion to the point of birth, restrictions on pro-life speech, government recognition of gay marriage as equivalent to the biblically prescribed union of a man and woman — all of it is consistent with Buttigieg’s version of Christianity. Needless to say, so is the liberal wish list on a whole host of other issues. On “Meet the Press,” Buttigieg said that Christ’s dictates about caring for the “least of these my brethren” and the “stranger” means America must do more for immigrants. Notably, Buttigieg took to Twitter recently to spread nonsense that has been soundly disproven about President Trump calling immigrants “animals”; in fact, Trump was referring to MS-13 gang members who have been inflicting brutal violence on American communities. Buttigieg even had the nerve to call evangelical Christians “hypocrites” for supporting Trump. Buttigieg went so far as to question Trump’s belief in God, chiding Christians for supporting someone who seems to lack the sort of humility that Jesus held up as a spiritual ideal, all while boldly claiming that his own unapologetic same-sex marriage puts him on the “right side of history.” In a race that is shaping up to be a referendum on socialism in America, liberals have somehow convinced themselves that Buttigieg represents a nonexistent middle ground between an economic system based on freedom and one based on coercion. The media are playing along with Mayor Pete’s attempt to thread the needle between unrepentant socialists such as Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and President Trump’s determination that “America will never be a socialist country.” This fantasy doesn’t survive even the most basic inspection. One of the oft-cited entries on Buttigieg’s long list of progressive credentials is winning the JFK Presidential Library’s 2000 “Profile in Courage” essay contest as a teenager. One wonders if the reporters fueling Buttigieg’s growing celebrity actually have read his essay, which cites Bernie Sanders as Buttigieg’s political hero and praises the then-Vermont congressman’s “courage” for adopting the socialist mantle. It should come as no surprise, then, that even as he now tries to position himself as a “capitalist” presidential candidate, Buttigieg still sees capitalism as being “in tension” with democracy. Anyone expecting Pete Buttigieg to be the Democratic Party’s centrist savior in a deeply divided presidential race ought to consider that last remark carefully, because it’s a perfect example of the sort of pandering that alienates voters on both ends of the political spectrum. Buttigieg is no centrist. He’s just another opportunistic politician who thinks he can avoid tackling the real issues by telling everybody what they want to hear. He’s only a rockstar in the imaginations of the mainstream media who are failing to vet him as he masquerades as a credible candidate for president.



Buttigieg campaign says it will stop using 'Pharisees' to describe conservative Christians
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... o-describe
Category: Politics
Published: April 17, 2019

Description: A spokesperson for South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s (D) presidential campaign said Tuesday that the candidate will no longer use the term “Pharisee” to describe what he perceives as religious hypocrisy. Buttigieg has repeatedly used the term in reference to Vice President Pence to accuse Pence of hypocrisy for serving in President Trump’s administration while espousing conservative Christian values.

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Progressive Jewish leaders have argued the use of the term as an insult has anti-Semitic undertones. Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg referred back to an earlier tweet in which she said use of the term as an insult by non-Jewish people “has been used to murder & expel us for centuries--Inquisitions, pogroms, expulsions, the Holocaust, you name it.”
If someone on @PeteButtigieg's campaign cares about the fact that his repeated use of "Pharisee" is harmful to Jews and would be open to learning about why and how to do better, y'all are welcome to reach out to me. I can kasher pots and talk about antisemitism at the same time.
— Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg (@TheRaDR) April 16, 2019

In response, Buttigieg spokesperson Lis Smith tweeted “We appreciate the people who have reached out to educate us on this. While intended to highlight political hypocrisy, we listened and learned and won’t be using it going forward.”
We appreciate the people who have reached out to educate us on this. While intended to highlight political hypocrisy, we listened and learned and won’t be using it going forward.
— Lis Smith (@Lis_Smith) April 16, 2019

Pharisees were a Jewish sect that existed in the first century, and are depicted in the New Testament as frequently in conflict with Jesus. “When you see someone, especially somebody who has such a dogmatic take on faith that they bring it into public life, being willing to attach themselves to this administration for the purposes of gaining power, it is alarmingly resonant with some New Testament themes, and not in a good way,” Buttigieg told The Washington Post in reference to Pence. The controversy, and Buttigieg’s pledge, echo an earlier story in which the 37-year-old used the phrase “all lives matter” in a speech. Buttigieg said he was not aware of controversy over the phrase, which racial justice advocates have claimed deliberately minimize the hardships faced specifically by black Americans.



Barney Frank: Buttigieg wouldn't be getting the same attention 'if he were straight'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... be-getting
Category: Politics
Published: April 18, 2019

Description: Former Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) says he doesn't think Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg would have had the same meteoric rise in the polls he's seen "if he was straight." “If he were straight, I don’t think he’d be getting the attention that he’s getting,” Frank told host Chris Matthews on MSNBC's "Hardball" on Wednesday.

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But Frank added, that when Buttigieg "gets the attention, he is so talented and good at this and solid that he makes the most of it.” Both Buttigieg and Frank are openly gay. Matthews contrasted the reception Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., received with Frank's own experiences in Congress. He recalled that when Frank came out to then-House Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill (D-Mass.), O’Neill responded that he was “sorry to hear it,” saying Frank could otherwise have been Speaker some day. Frank called Buttigieg's progress “both a sign that the prejudice is diminishing and it is an opportunity further to diminish the prejudice by giving him this platform.” Buttigieg during a speech in Iowa this week was interrupted by far-right activist Randall Terry, who shouted “remember Sodom and Gomorrah.” The next day at another event, Buttigieg was greeted by protesters dressed as him, Satan and Jesus. “People don’t get heckled if nobody thinks they’re a threat,” Frank told Matthews about the protesters. “The fact that these bigoted lunatics start acting out in public, it’s a sign of their desperation.” Buttigieg has overcome initial low name recognition and a crowded Democratic field to surge to the upper tier of Democratic candidates in recent weeks. Multiple polls have shown the 37-year-old mayor in third place behind former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). A national poll indicates that if the former vice president, who has not yet officially announced a bid, declines to run, Buttigieg would be the second choice for 17 percent of Biden supporters.



Buttigieg: 'Frankly, I came out because I wanted to date'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... ed-to-date
Category: Lifestyle
Published: April 23, 2019

Description: South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg said on Monday that he came out because he wanted to date, and that doing so meant he eventually met his current husband. "Frankly, I came out because I wanted to date," Buttigieg said at a CNN town hall when asked by host Anderson Cooper about whether he would have been different had he come out publicly at a younger age. "If dating had been available to me in my 20s I'm not sure I would have gotten that much done," Buttigieg then joked. Buttigieg has said he came out publicly at 33. But turning more serious, the 2020 presidential candidate said his decision to date more meant he eventually found husband, Chasten Buttigieg. “I don't know how I would do this without him," he said about the 2020 campaign for president. Pete Buttigieg has talked openly about being gay in his campaign, discussing his decision to come out and what it has meant in his life and revealing that he met his husband on the app Hinge. Chasten Buttigieg has also become a key part of the campaign, becoming a celebrity in his own right.



Franklin Graham rails against Buttigieg for calling himself 'gay Christian'
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... -christian
Category: Religion
Published: April 24, 2019

Description: Evangelist Franklin Graham, an outspoken supporter of President Trump, on Wednesday slammed 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for calling himself a "gay christian," saying that the Bible defines homosexuality as something to be repentant of. "Buttigieg is right—God doesn’t have a political party," Graham tweeted. "But God does have commandments, laws & standards He gives us to live by. God doesn’t change. His Word is the same yesterday, today & forever." Graham, the son of legendary preacher Billy Graham, added in a separate tweet that "as a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized." "The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women," Graham said, before saying in a final tweet that "the core of the Christian faith is believing and following Jesus Christ, who God sent to be the Savior of the world—to save us from sin, to save us from hell, to save us from eternal damnation.
Presidential candidate & South Bend Mayor @PeteButtigieg is right—God doesn’t have a political party. But God does have commandments, laws & standards He gives us to live by. God doesn’t change. His Word is the same yesterday, today & forever. 1/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

Mayor Buttigieg says he’s a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women. 2/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

The core of the Christian faith is believing and following Jesus Christ, who God sent to be the Savior of the world—to save us from sin, to save us from hell, to save us from eternal damnation. 3/3
— Franklin Graham (@Franklin_Graham) April 24, 2019

Buttigieg's campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill. The comments from Graham came days after Buttigieg stated that "God doesn't have a political party" while talking about the ways he would unite liberal and conservative people of faith in his 2020 campaign. Buttigieg, who is openly gay, has been extremely open about faith since launching an exploratory committee for president earlier this year. The 37-year-old has taken aim at the Trump administration, and has repeatedly criticized Vice President Pence over his religious beliefs. “The vice president is entitled to his religious beliefs," Buttigieg said on CNN last week."My problem is when those religious beliefs are used as an excuse to harm other people." Buttigieg has also said that President Trump's actions make it hard to "believe that they're the actions of somebody who believes in God." Graham has been a vocal supporter of Trump throughout his presidency. He said in November that he endorses Trump because he defends the Christian faith. "Now people say 'Well Frank but how can you defend him, when he's lived such a sordid life?' " Graham said on "Axios on HBO." "I never said he was the best example of the Christian faith. He defends the faith. And I appreciate that very much."



Chasten Buttigieg emerges as Mayor Pete's secret weapon
The Hill

URL: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4 ... ret-weapon
Category: Politics
Published: April 27, 2019

Description: Chasten Buttigieg has emerged as a star in the Democratic primary, becoming a key part of his husband Pete Buttigieg's campaign and helping the South Bend, Ind., mayor stand out in a crowded field. The 29-year-old school humanities and drama junior high teacher from Michigan not only functions as a much sought-after campaign spokesman and adviser, but he is also helping humanize the first gay major presidential candidate in a country that only legalized same-sex marriage four years ago. But as Pete Buttigieg, 37, becomes a major contender for the nomination, questions are emerging about whether the gay couple will have the same appeal in more conservative parts of the country as they do with Democratic primary voters. “The bigger question is: if he were to win the nomination how voters in key states who might not know any married gay couples and be uncomfortable with their relationship may react, and I think that remains to be seen,” Tim Miller, former communications director to Jeb Bush and GOP strategist. For now, as Pete Buttigieg, also widely known as Mayor Pete, has surged in the Democratic polls, so has the attention lavished on Chasten Buttigieg, who took a leave from the Montessori Academy to join him on the campaign trail. Though Pete Buttigieg is not the first gay candidate to seek a party’s presidential nomination — Fred Karger ran in the Republican primary in 2012 — he is widely seen as the first with a genuine shot at winning. And he has done so by making his biography as a gay Christian millennial, Rhodes Scholar and Afghanistan war veteran a key part of his campaign, including his love for Chasten Buttigieg. The couple speak openly about their relationship, including how they met through a dating app, their first date, and their marriage in 2018. They also own two dogs, Buddy and Truman, and Pete Buttigieg has talked about eventually having kids. Chasten Buttigieg now introduces his husband at some stops and also branches out on his own, including addressing the Human Rights Campaign in Houston and visiting the Ali Forney Center, a shelter for homeless LGBTQ young people, in New York. Pete Buttigieg’s husband has also seen his social media following surge, and now counts over 100,000 followers on Instagram and around 300,000 followers on Twitter — more than some of the 2020 candidates in the race like Reps. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) or Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.). That visibility is unusual for a spouse or partner at such an early stage in the primary process, let alone a gay couple that remains one of the youngest in the Democratic field of over 20 candidates. “Its still very odd for me to see what the most normal looking couple, or the least fretful,” said Mark Rom, associate professor at Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy, “is the gay couple in the race.” No other Democratic contenders has seen their partner or spouse have such a visible part of the campaign, though they have made brief cameos, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) husband in an Instagram video. Meanwhile, actress Rosario Dawson has talked about dating Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.). But strategists say that having Chasten Buttigieg play such a big role brings youth and authenticity to his husband's campaign, providing an advantage in a Democratic party where some are hungering for a fresh alternative to former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the two septuagenarians currently leading in the Democratic primary polls. “Chasten brings an authenticity to the campaign that is really valuable - particularly with his online presence,” Miller said. “He interacts like a normal millennial human online, not like a stilted or scripted pol and there's a lot of appeal to that. In some ways his persona reflects onto and humanizes Pete who is more straight-laced and political in his communications. Strategists also say that Chasten Buttigieg has an added advantage, helping Pete Buttigieg further stand out at a time when some Democratic primary voters are wary of nominating a traditional straight white male in a rapidly diversifying party. “It reminds Democratic primary voters that he is gay, which is a plus. It helps distinguish him from other white males in the race," said David Barker, a professor of government at American University, about how Chasten Buttigieg helps Pete Buttigieg's campaign. However, whether such openness will be accepted by more conservative — and older — parts of the country, should Pete Buttigieg clinch the nomination, remains in doubt, even as a number of LGBTQ lawmakers have been elected in recent years, including Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D) from traditionally red state Arizona. Pete Buttigieg this month openly feuded with Vice President Pence, attacking the religious conservative for his stance on LGBTQ issues and gay marriage. "Being married to Chasten has made me a better human being because it has made me more compassionate, more understanding, more self-aware and more decent," he said at a widely-quoted speech at the LGBTQ Victory Fund's annual brunch, earlier this month. "My marriage to Chasten has made me a better man. And yes, Mr. Vice President, it has moved me closer to God," he added, prompting applause. Pence has opposed legalizing gay marriage, something he says stems from his Christian faith. Most recently Buttigieg was attacked by Franklin Graham, son of the late preacher Billy Graham. “Mayor Buttigieg says he’s a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women,” Graham tweeted on Wednesday. Still, some strategists dismiss the prospect that Pete Buttigieg, along with Chasten Buttigieg, might suffer because they are gay, noting that many conservatives opposed to same-sex marriage would probably not vote Democratic anyway. Instead, they encouraged the Buttigiegs to continue being open about their relationship. “Pete Buttigieg is a wunderkind, but at the core of it all is authenticity. His appeal is that he is young and smart, of course, but he is leading with his full self,” Democratic strategist Don Calloway, CEO of Pine Street strategies, said. “They are young, handsome and happy and in love, so their relationship is an asset to the campaign, much like it would be for a straight couple.”
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Re: Buttigieg explains rise of socialism: 'Capitalism has let a lot of people down'

Postby samurai » Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:46 am



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S O C I A L I S M

Think of Something Really Gay -

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That's How Socialist I Am

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Pete Buttigieg's father was a Marxist professor who lauded the Communist Manifesto

Postby smix » Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:24 am

Pete Buttigieg's father was a Marxist professor who lauded the Communist Manifesto
Washington Examiner

URL: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news ... -manifesto
Category: Politics
Published: April 2, 2019

Description: The father of Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg was a Marxist professor who spoke fondly of the Communist Manifesto and dedicated a significant portion of his academic career to the work of Italian Communist Party founder Antonio Gramsci, an associate of Vladimir Lenin. Joseph Buttigieg, who died in January at the age of 71, immigrated to the U.S. in the 1970s from Malta and in 1980 joined the University of Notre Dame faculty, where he taught modern European literature and literary theory. He supported an updated version of Marxism that jettisoned some of Marx and Engel's more doctrinaire theories, though he was undoubtedly Marxist. He was an adviser to Rethinking Marxism, an academic journal that published articles “that seek to discuss, elaborate, and/or extend Marxian theory,” and a member of the editorial collective of Boundary 2, a journal of postmodern theory, literature, and culture. He spoke at many Rethinking Marxism conferences and other gatherings of prominent Marxists. In a 2000 paper for Rethinking Marxism critical of the approach of Human Rights Watch, Buttigieg, along with two other authors, refers to "the Marxist project to which we subscribe." In 1998, he wrote in an article for the Chronicle of Higher Education about an event in New York City celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Manifesto. He also participated in the event. "If The Communist Manifesto was meant to liberate the proletariat, the Manifesto itself in recent years needed liberating from Marxism's narrow post-Cold War orthodoxies and exclusive cadres. It has been freed," he wrote. "After a musical interlude, seven people read different portions of the Manifesto. Listening to it read, one could not help but be struck by the poignancy of its prose," he wrote. The readers "had implicitly warned even us faithful to guard against conferring upon it the status of Scripture, a repository of doctrinal verities." “Equity, environmental consciousness, and racial justice are surely some of the ingredients of a healthy Marxism. Indeed, Marxism's greatest appeal — undiminished by the collapse of Communist edifices — is the imbalances produced by other sociopolitical governing structures,” Buttigieg wrote. Paul Kengor, a professor at Grove City College and an expert in communism and progressivism, said Buttigieg was among a group of leftist professors who focused on injecting Marxism into the wider culture. "They’re part of a wider international community of Marxist theorists and academicians with a particular devotion to the writings of the late Italian Marxist theorist Antonio Gramsci, who died over 80 years ago. Gramsci was all about applying Marxist theory to culture and cultural institutions — what is often referred to as a 'long march through the institutions,' such as film, media, and especially education," Kengor told the Washington Examiner. Pete Buttigieg, an only child, shared a close relationship with his father. In his memoir Shortest Way Home, Pete called his dad a “man of the left, no easy thing on a campus like Notre Dame’s in the 1980s.” He wrote that while he did not understand his parents’ political discussions as a young child, “the more I heard these aging professors talk, the more I wanted to learn how to decrypt their sentences, and to grasp the political backstory of the grave concerns that commanded their attention and aroused such fist-pounding dinner debate.” Pete wrote that his dad was supportive when he came out as gay. He and his husband bought a house in South Bend around the corner from his parents, which gave the couple “a good support network despite our work and travel schedules” when they decided to get a dog. The elder Buttigieg was best known as one of the world’s leading scholars of Gramsci. Gramsci thought cultural change was critical to dismantling capitalism. Nevertheless, although critical of certain aspects of Bolshevism, Gramsci endorsed Vladimir Lenin’s “maximalist” politics and identified within the Leninist faction of the Italian communists. He went to Moscow in 1922 as the official representative of the Italian Communist Party and returned home to lead the resistance against Italy’s Prime Minister Benito Mussolini, on the orders of Lenin, while his new wife and children stayed in the USSR. Those efforts landed Gramsci in an Italian prison, where he lived much of his brief life, which ended in 1937 at the age of 46. Yet his time behind bars was also some of his most prolific, leading to a collection of essays called the Prison Notebooks. Buttigieg completed the authoritative English translation of Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks, and his articles on Gramsci have been translated into five languages. Buttigieg was a founding member and president of the International Gramsci Society, an organization that aims to “facilitate communication and the exchange of information among the very large number of individuals from all over the world who are interested in Antonio Gramsci's life and work and in the presence of his thought in contemporary culture.” In 2013, Buttigieg spoke at a $500,000 outdoor New York City art installation honoring Gramsci.
Joseph Buttigieg, presidente International Gramsci Society. #GramsciMonument

joseph-buttigieg-gramsci.jpg

— Manuela Cavalieri (@ManuelaCav) August 10, 2013

Buttigieg died just days after Mayor Pete announced his 2020 presidential exploratory committee. Lis Smith, communications adviser for Buttigieg’s presidential exploratory committee, declined to comment on how his father influenced his political beliefs or on Pete Buttigieg's thoughts on Marxist thinkers such as Gramsci. Pete Buttigieg said in an MSNBC interview on March 20 that he considers himself a capitalist but that the system needs changes. “The biggest problem with capitalism right now is the way it's become intertwined with power and is eroding our democracy,” Buttigieg said, noting the influence of big businesses in government. A self-described progressive, Buttigieg has called to abolish the Electoral College system, supports a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and thinks that climate change is a national security threat. In another MSNBC interview in February, Buttigieg said that socialism “is a word in American politics that has basically lost all meaning” and “has been used as a kill switch to stop an idea from being talked about.” After his son won his mayoral election in 2011, Joseph Buttigieg told the Notre Dame student newspaper that he never expected him to run for office. “I know Peter has been interested in politics for a long time,” Buttigieg said. “At home we always discussed government affairs, but never in that way … I’m very pleased because he’s doing something he genuinely likes."



Buttigieg high school essay praised Sanders as courageous for calling himself 'Socialist'
Washington Examiner

URL: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/poli ... -socialist
Category: Politics
Published: April 17, 2019

Description: Pete Buttigieg, in an award-winning high school essay he wrote in 2000, praised Bernie Sanders as courageous for describing himself as a "Socialist." The essay, which received the Profile in Courage Essay Contest award from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and Library, criticized candidates who abandoned their ideals to appeal to a larger number of voters. The 37-year-old presidential candidate singled out Sanders as an example of political “courage.” “Sanders’ courage is evident in the first word he uses to describe himself: ‘Socialist,’" wrote Buttigieg. “In a country where Communism is still the dirtiest of ideological dirty words, in a climate where even liberalism is considered radical, and Socialism is immediately and perhaps willfully confused with Communism, a politician dares to call himself a socialist? He does indeed. "Here is someone who has ‘looked into his own soul’ and expressed an ideology, the endorsement of which, in today’s political atmosphere, is analogous to a self-inflicted gunshot wound,” added Buttigieg. “Even though he has lived through a time in which an admitted socialist could not act in a film, let alone hold a Congressional seat, Sanders is not afraid to be candid about his political persuasion.” The South Bend, Ind., mayor’s essay also suggests that Sanders, then an obscure, radical House member from Vermont, inspired his decision to enter politics. “I commend Bernie Sanders for giving me an answer to those who say American young people see politics as a cesspool of corruption, beyond redemption. I have heard that no sensible young person today would want to give his or her life to public service. I can personally assure you this is untrue,” he wrote. Buttigieg’s father, Joseph Buttigieg, who passed away in January, was a Marxist professor who praised the Communist Manifesto and was an adviser to the Rethinking Marxism academic journal, the Washington Examiner reported earlier this month. "If The Communist Manifesto was meant to liberate the proletariat, the Manifesto itself in recent years needed liberating from Marxism's narrow post-Cold War orthodoxies and exclusive cadres. It has been freed,” wrote Joseph Buttigieg in a 1998 article for the Chronicle of Higher Education. While Buttigieg has shied away from calling himself a socialist on the campaign trail, he has questioned the fairness of the capitalist system and called for reforms. Buttigieg, a virtual unknown before he entered the presidential race, has been moving steadily up in early polls. He came in third behind Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders in an Emerson survey this week, edging out better-known candidates such as Sens. Kamala Harris of California and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.
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Opinion: Pete Buttigieg's campaign slides toward socialism

Postby smix » Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:40 am

Opinion: Pete Buttigieg's campaign slides toward socialism
Indy Star

URL: https://www.indystar.com/story/opinion/ ... 882522002/
Category: Politics
Published: February 17, 2019

Description: Of all the values we prize as human beings, freedom should be the most important.
If you had any doubts about the embrace of socialism by the 2020 Democratic presidential field, they should be gone by now. One of Indiana’s own potential contenders — South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg — has jumped into the collectivist basket with both feet. Although acknowledging that America has a market-based economy and is “committed to democracy,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper that a discussion about a policy can no longer be “killed off” by declaring that it’s socialism. He denounced President Trump’s damnation of socialism during his State of the Union address as an outmoded strategy of the Cold War era when “you saw a time in politics when the world socialism could be used to end an argument.” Today, he said, a word like socialism is the “beginning of a debate.” I’m not sure how Buttigieg squares “market-based economy” and “committed to democracy” with beginning a debate with the word socialism, but fine. Let the arguments begin. I’ll leave it to the economists to explain how command economies smother competition and thwart growth, condemning whole populations to an equality of misery. I’ll let the military experts detail the millions of people from Russia to China and Cambodia to Venezuela who have been sacrificed in the futile search for socialist utopia. I will hope the historians explain why the American Revolution was so much more sensible and, yes, moral than the French Revolution. I will defer to the clear-eyed empiricists to answer the chief arguments of the statist apologists who answer the complaint that “socialism has never worked” with “real socialism has never been tried” and “all socialist efforts have been thwarted by evil capitalist tyrants.” I will even forgo my usual cynical assessment that this country has socialized capitalism so much that the only real question up for debate is how much more socialist it will become, and how quickly. But I will make a small effort to express my strong objections to the philosophical underpinnings of socialism. Despite all the variations government experiments have explored over the centuries, there are really only two fundamental approaches. Government either celebrates the individual or it demands subservience to the group. There is freedom or there is no freedom. And that is it. Of all the values we prize as human beings, freedom should be the most important. If we have freedom, all things are possible. If we do not have freedom, none are. This country was founded on the idea of freedom — that rights inhere in the individual — that, in Jefferson’s words, “that government is best which governs the least.” Capitalism, with all its inequalities, uncertainties and other bumps along the road, is the logical economic system of that belief. And socialism is its antithesis. Any system that has as its foundation the subservience of the individual to the group will eventually elevate the group to the point where the individual no longer matters. The idea that an elite few has both the obligation and the ability to dictate the welfare of all will mature into the idea that those few have the right to control everyone. And that is tyranny. We don’t even have to follow that arrogance to its logical, bloody and inevitable conclusion to be a little frightened. Just consider the economies of states like Illinois and California that are nearing collapse as governments reach and surpass the ability to give away other people’s money. Just consider the cliff on which the federal government teeters with its trillions in debt, borrowing 40 cents of every dollar it spends. That which cannot continue will not continue. If the idea of tyranny doesn’t frighten you, what do you think about anarchy? Or think about the Green New Deal, the American socialists’ current version of utopia for this country. It aims, in a single decade, to eliminate fossil fuels, retrofit every house in America and return agriculture to subsistence levels. The effect on American life would be enormous, the cost incalculable. As far as I can tell, the point of such ecological zealotry is to save the environment by making the country unlivable. Mayor Buttigieg loves the Green New Deal. He says it is "the right beginning" for a broad plan to combat climate change. The beginning? Forgive me for my outmoded thinking, but that’s a debate ender for me.
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Openly Gay Trump Admin Member Compares Buttigieg to Jussie Smollett

Postby smix » Tue Apr 23, 2019 7:26 pm

Openly Gay Trump Admin Member Compares Buttigieg to Jussie Smollett
Townhall

URL: https://townhall.com/tipsheet/cortneyob ... e-n2545107
Category: Politics
Published: April 20, 2019

Description: South Bend, Indiana Mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg insists on picking a fight with Vice President Mike Pence, but so far he's been disappointed. Pence has "no problem" with Buttigieg, having worked with him when he was governor of Indiana. He's known him for years. Still, the mayor insists that Pence's belief in traditional marriage and his views on homosexuality are bigoted and backward. U.S. ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell is also gay, yet he took Pence's side on this one. In a recent Fox News interview, he not only defended the Pences' character, but he went so far as to accuse Buttigieg of staging a "hate hoax" in the same vein as "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett.
Amb. @RichardGrenell: “Mike Pence is a friend of mine. Mike and Karen are great people. They’re godly people. They’re followers of Christ. They don’t have hate in their hearts for anyone.” How about you @PeteButtigieg? You have hate in your heart?

fox-buttigieg-pence.jpg

— Arthur Schwartz (@ArthurSchwartz) April 19, 2019

Pence, Grenell shared, has warmly "accepted" him and his partner, and have always extended to them Christian hospitality. Buttigieg, meanwhile, "has been pushing this hate hoax along the lines of Jussie Smollett for a very long time now." Grenell finds it "really ironic" that Buttigieg waited to speak out against Pence until he announced his campaign for president. Media analysts agree that Buttigieg's unnecessary and one-sided bickering with Pence is not a good look.
Pete Buttigieg is a talented politician with a bright future in his party. But his cynical effort to pick a fight with Pence, who has praised him and treated him with respect, is a stain that will last. @RichardGrenell nails it here.
— Brit Hume (@brithume) April 19, 2019

Gay rights groups, however, argue that a sitting ambassador shouldn't be weighing in on 2020 candidates.
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My Mayor Pete Problem

Postby smix » Sun Jul 14, 2019 4:09 pm

My Mayor Pete Problem
Presidential Newstalk - Dale Peck

URL: https://presidentialnewstalk.com/2019/0 ... e-problem/
Category: Lifestyle
Published: July 12, 2019

Description: One of the worst things I ever did happened in 1992. I was leaving the bar called The Bar (RIP) on Second Avenue and 4th Street to go to a party called Tattooed Love Child at another bar, Fez, located in the basement of Time Cafe (RIP x 2). TLC was held on Wednesdays (Thursdays?), and I often went to The Bar after work for a few hours so I wouldn’t have to go all the way home first. So it was probably 10-ish, and I know it was late winter/early spring because I was carrying a copy of the completed manuscript of my first novel Martin and John, which I’d just turned in to my publisher that very day. Which makes me 24 and old enough to know better. Or who knows, maybe this was exactly the age to learn this kind of lesson. What happened was: I was halfway down 4th Street when I heard someone yelling. I turned to see a large fellow running after me. At first I wondered if I was getting gay-bashed. But even though this guy didn’t set off my gaydar he still didn’t seem particularly menacing. When he got closer I clocked the pleated khakis (this was the era of the ACT UP clone—Doc Martens, Levi’s tight or baggy, and activist T-shirts—which look I had embraced fully) and rust-colored Brillo hair. I love me a good ginger, but you gotta know how to style it, especially if it runs frizzy. And so anyway, this guy, whose name was Garfield but said I could call him Gar, told me he’d been in The Bar but had been too shy to talk to me and decided to try his luck on the street. As politely as I could, I told him I wasn’t interested. He asked me how I could know I wasn’t interested when I didn’t know him, which was an invitation for me to tell him that not only did he look like a potato, he dressed, talked, and ran like a potato. Alas, I chose not to indulge his masochistic invitation. He asked where I was going and I told him. He asked if he could go with me and I told him he could go to Fez if he wanted but he shouldn’t think he was going with me. He came. I quickly learned that he’d mastered the art of speaking in questions, which put me in the awkward position of answering him or ignoring him, which made me feel rude even though I’d told him I wasn’t interested. When he found out I was a writer he got excited and said I must love the New Yorker! I told him I hated the New Yorker. He asked how I could hate the New Yorker and I told him that besides the fact that the New Yorker published shitty fiction (plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose), and the only gay fiction it published was assimilationist and boring, there was also the fact that an editor there (Dan Menaker, if we’re naming names) had rejected a story of mine by suggesting in his correspondence with my agent (by which I mean that he wasn’t embarrassed to write this down, let alone worried about repercussions) that psychological problems were preventing me from creating effective fiction. (By the way, fuck you, Dan.) None of which made any sense to Gar. The New Yorker was important so I must love it. I just didn’t know I loved it yet. Or something like that. At some point in this exchange I remember saying something along the lines of Look, I’m just going to apologize now, because it’s pretty clear that sooner or later I’m going to say something really offensive to you and your feelings are going to be hurt. I don’t want to do that, but you’re clearly not getting the fact that you and I don’t look at the world the same way, and you keep thinking that if you hang around long enough we’re going to find common ground, when all you’re really doing is making our differences that much clearer. He laughed at this, one of those confused/nervous/defensive laughs, and if I’d been more mature I would have been more blunt and told him to get lost. But I too was a little deluded. I thought he had to get the hint eventually. But although I understood pretty much everything else about him, I failed to reckon fully with his lack of self-respect. I told him I hated the New Yorker.

fez.jpeg

So: we got to Fez, where I ran into my friend Patrick (Cox, I think, but it’s been a minute), who looked at me like, What are you doing with this weirdo? I wouldn’t let Gar buy me a drink and I did my best to exclude him from my conversation with Patrick but he still wouldn’t take a hint. He must have hung around for a good hour. My answers to his questions grew more and more peremptory. Bear in mind I wasn’t disagreeing with him or dismissing his opinions just to get rid of him: we really had absolutely nothing in common. But we both read the New Yorker and we were both gay and we both wore clothes to cover our nakedness so clearly we were birds of a feather. Finally he said he had to leave. He asked for my number. I remember Patrick laughing in his face, but maybe that’s just because I wanted to laugh in his face. I was like, Are you serious? And he was like, We have so much in common, we should get to know each other better! When I was fifteen years old a pedophile used that line on me in the Chicago bus station, and if I’m being honest I had more in common with the pedo, who was about 50, black, and urban, while I was a white teenager from rural Kansas, than I did with dear old Gar. I told him I wasn’t going to give him my phone number or accept his. He seemed genuinely shocked and hurt, which of course made me feel like shit, which of course made me mad, because why should I feel like shit when I’d spent all night trying to rebuff him? He asked what he would have to do to get me to go out with him. Without thinking, I said, Take a good look at yourself and your world, reject everything in it, and then get back to me. It was the kind of soul-killing line people are always delivering in movies but never comes off in real life, mostly because even the most oblivious, self-hating person usually has enough wherewithal to cut someone off before they’re fully read for filth. I believe I have indicated that Gar did not possess this level of self-awareness. His face went shapeless and blank as though the bones of his skull had melted. For one second I thought I saw a hint of anger, which might’ve been the first thing he’d done all night that I could identify with. Then he scurried away. Now, I’ve said shitty things to people before and since, but this one’s always stuck with me, partly because, though I’m a peevish fellow, it’s rare that I speak with genuine cruelty, and when I do it’s because I’ve chosen to. This just came out of me. But mostly I remember it because I knew I’d seriously wounded this guy, which, however annoying and clueless he was, was never my intention. I was and still am a very ’90s kind of gay, which is to say that I believe in the brotherhood of homos and the strength of our community, that however different we are we’re all bound together by the nature of our desire and the experience of living in a homophobic world. When one of your brothers fucks up, you school him. Sure, you might get a little Larry Kramer about it, but you don’t go all Arya-and-the-Night-King on his ass. I’m telling you this because it’s what popped into my head when I tried to pin down my distaste for Pete Buttigieg. Mary Pete and I are just not the same kind of gay. (For those of you wondering about “Mary Pete”: a couple of months ago I asked Facebook what the gay equivalent of Uncle Tom was, and this was the answer at which we collectively arrived.) But Mary Pete and I aren’t different in the same way that Gar and I were different. Gar and I had nothing in common. Mary Pete and I have a lot in common, but at a certain point we came to a fork in the road and I took the one less traveled and he took the one that was freshly paved and bordered by flowers and white picket fences and every house had a hybrid in the driveway and some solar panels on the ceiling, but discrete ones, nothing garish, nothing that would interfere with the traditional look of the neighborhood or the resale value of your home. By which I mean: Mary Pete is a neoliberal and a Jeffersonian meritocrat, which is to say he’s just another unrepentant or at least unexamined beneficiary of white male privilege who believes (just as Jay Inslee believes he’s done more for women’s reproductive rights than Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar) that he can make life better for all those people who are not like him, not because he knows anything about their lives but because he’s smart and nice and well-meaning, and when smart nice well-meaning people run things everything works out for the best. That’s just, you know, logical. It’s like, science. Like Kirsten Gillibrand, he believes in “healthy capitalism,” which is a bit like saying you believe in “healthy cancer”: Yeah, you can (usually) treat it, but wouldn’t you rather be cured?
Pete and I are just not the same kind of gay.

Image

Most of what I dislike about Mary Pete was expressed in this Current Affairs article, which does a good job of using his own words (mostly from, ugh, Shortest Way Home, his memoir pretending to manifesto) to damn him. Shortest Way Home conjures a young Harvard student who thinks the word “edgy” is sufficient to describe both proto-Dumpster fascist Lyndon LaRouche and Noam Chomsky. His description of Harvard Square takes in those actors who belong to the school; the homeless people who live there are invisible to him, or, even worse, not worth mentioning. He seems perfectly content to dismiss left-wing student activists as “social justice warriors” despite the fact that this phrase is paradigmatic in right-wing discourse. He speaks fondly of his time at McKinsey, a company regularly described as one of the most evil corporations in the world. He joined the military long after 9/11 could sort-of-but-not-really be invoked to justify the U.S. propensity to go to other countries and kill lots of people. By 2007 it was no longer possible to pretend that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were anything other than failed, murderous exercises in empire-building and/or revenge, but despite the fact that these were the only places he was likely to serve he signed up anyway. And though he loves to talk about the notes he left his family in case he didn’t come back, by all accounts his chances of seeing combat were as low as they could be—but boy, he sure got a lot of cute pictures in uniform out of it! Every move is simultaneously cynical and morally oblivious. They’re the steps one takes not to learn about the world but to become a marketable political candidate (hmmm, what’s a good counter to the whole sleeps-with-men thing? I know: military service!) (side benefit: you’re surrounded by hot guys!) and if as a Harvard-educated Rhodes Scholar you decide not to be a captain of industry, then clearly the White House is where you belong. I mean, sure, he wants to make the world a better place. But the operative word in that sentence, just as it was with Bill Clinton, is “he,” not “world,” and “better,” for Mary Pete, is just the neoliberal variation of “make America great again,” which is to say that in Buttigieg’s version of American history the progressive ideals in the First, Thirteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments, in the Civil Rights Act and Roe v. Wade and marriage equality, are the only authentically American ideas, whereas slavery and Jim Crow and border security and defense of marriage campaigns and heartbeat laws are nothing but aberrations, glitches in the code rather than yin to liberalism’s yang, warp to its weft, a set of ivory chess pieces lined up across from a set of ebony chess pieces and equally powerful. Like Obama, Buttigieg seems always to be saying that the United States is the only place where someone like him could’ve succeeded, and that he wants everyone to enjoy the same peculiarly American successes that he’s had. But unlike Obama (whose naïveté was at least partly a pose), Buttigieg’s biography belies the idea that his success was either hard won or particularly unlikely. He’s lived the life of a comfortably middle-class white male, but he acts as if it’s his natural gifts (by which he means his intelligence and his ability to speak seven languages and play the piano, although they’re actually his whiteness and maleness and financial security) that have raised him above from the rabble. It’s right there in his “Medicare for all . . . who want it” song and dance. To Mary Pete this is simple egalitarianism and freedom of choice. If you want Medicare, you should be able to have it. And if you want private insurance you should be able to have that. It seems never to occur to him to ask why one would want to pay three or four or ten times more for health care than you have to. Could it possibly be because private insurance will get you better results than Medicare? And could private health care possibly provide better service than Medicare not because of marketplace competition but because as long as there’s a profit motive in health care medical corporations will always seek to maximize profits, and thus favor those “customers” who can pay the most? Embedded in this oblivion are both the liberal delusion that people are naturally good and the neoliberal sophistry that the market, like the tide, will raise everyone up with it.
Pete is just the neoliberal variation of “make America great again.”

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Or take his response at the Democratic debate to the murder of Eric Logan by the South Bend police: “I’m not allowed to take sides until the investigation comes back.” Here is a mayor—a man—whose first allegiance isn’t to the victim or the victim’s family or the other people at risk because of a racist police force, but, at the very best, to the system, and maybe to nothing more than his own political future as a centrist Democrat. “I accept responsibility,” he told us, in the same way that the white teenaged boy who gets caught stealing a car or drunk-raping a girl says “I accept responsibility” and fully expects to let off without punishment, because boys will be boys, after all, and isn’t feeling bad punishment enough? Free education? Why, that’s unfair to the working class! They’ll end up paying for the education of all those millions and millions of billionaires’ children! What are we, czarist Russia? You keep looking for a politics rooted in justice or history or, at the very least, empathy, but everywhere you find nothing besides a kind of idealistic pragmatism, if that’s a thing: a belief that if we only talk about nice things, only nice things will happen. If we only acknowledge our strengths, our faults will fade away. If we trust smart people to do smart things, nothing dumb will happen. Hey, José loved it when Pete answered him in Spanish, right? Education has brought us closer together! All this makes Mary Pete different from every other left-leaning neoliberal in exactly zero ways. Because let’s face it. The only thing that distinguishes the mayor of South Bend from all those other well-educated reasonably intelligent white dudes who wanna be president is what he does with his dick (and possibly his ass, although I get a definite top-by-default vibe from him, which is to say that I bet he thinks about getting fucked but he’s too uptight to do it). So let’s dish the dish, homos. You know and I know that Mary Pete is a gay teenager. He’s a fifteen-year-old boy in a Chicago bus station wondering if it’s a good idea to go home with a fifty-year-old man so that he’ll finally understand what he is. He’s been out for, what, all of four years, and if I understand the narrative, he married the first guy he dated. And we all know what happens when gay people don’t get a real adolescence because they spent theirs in the closet: they go through it after they come out. And because they’re adults with their own incomes and no parents to rein them in they do it on steroids (often literally). If Shortest Way Home (I mean really, can you think of a more treacly title?) makes one thing clear, Mary Pete was never a teenager. But you can’t run away from that forever. Either it comes out or it eats you up inside. It can be fun, it can be messy, it can be tragic, it can be progenitive, transformative, ecstatic, or banal, but the last thing I want in the White House is a gay man staring down 40 who suddenly realizes he didn’t get to have all the fun his straight peers did when they were teenagers. I’m not saying I don’t want him to shave his chest or do Molly or try being the lucky Pierre (the timing’s trickier than it looks, but it can be fun when you work it out). These are rites of passage for a lot of gay men, and it fuels many aspects of gay culture. But like I said, I don’t want it in the White House. I want a man whose mind is on his job, not what could have been—or what he thinks he can still get away with. So yeah. Unlike my experience with Gar, I actually want to tell Mary Pete to take a good hard look at his world, at his experiences and his view of the public good as somehow synonymous with his own success, and I want him to reject it. I want to do this not because I have any particular desire to hurt his feelings, but because I made a similar journey, or at least started out from a similar place, and I was lucky enough to realize (thank you, feminism; thank you, ACT UP) that the only place that path leads is a gay parody of heteronormative bourgeois domesticity: the “historic” home, the “tasteful” decor (no more than one nude photograph of a muscular torso per room; statuary only if they’re fair copies of Greek or Roman originals), the two- or four- or six-pack depending on how often you can get to the gym and how much you hate yourself, the theatre (always spelled with an -re) subscription, the opera subscription, the ballet subscription, the book club, the AKC-certified toy dog with at least one charming neurosis and/or dietary tic, the winter vacation to someplace “tropical,” the summer vacation to someplace “cultural,” the specialty kitchen appliances—you just have to get a sous vide machine, it changed our life! Sorry, boys, that’s not a life, it’s something you buy from a catalog. It’s a stage set you build so you can convince everyone else (or maybe just yourself) that you’re as normal as they are. Call me a hick from the sticks, but I don’t want someone who fills out his life like he fills out an AP exam serving as the country’s moral compass. And no, I wouldn’t kick him out of bed.
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Mayor Pete, alleged homosexual, shall not be mocked

Postby smix » Sun Jul 14, 2019 5:48 pm

Mayor Pete, alleged homosexual, shall not be mocked
Spectator USA

URL: https://spectator.us/mayor-pete-mocked- ... -republic/
Category: Politics
Published: July 14, 2019

Description: The New Republic bends over and takes one for corporate neoliberalism

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I’ve never met Dale Peck, but I know him. That is to say, I’m familiar with the type, a generation of gay, downtown New York City artist I came to know well during my formative years in the city. When I arrived about 15 years ago, New York’s transformation into a globalist monoculture was well under way. The counterculture was nouveau hipsterdom, the first youth movement defined by consumerism – trucker hats, PBR, silkscreening and iPods. Peck’s generation, these scrappy gay men, 20 years older than me, had lived through more interesting and dangerous times and I gravitated toward them. Many never had money but were rich in grit and bawdy tales and remained the same low-rent bon vivants they had been in the 1990s. On Friday, Peck published a piece in the communist rag The New Republic titled ‘My Mayor Pete Problem.’ He repeated what I’ve been saying for months about Pete, that the base does not like this neoliberal Hillaryite from Indiana. The case is stronger with the gays who, like myself, see him as a late-blooming, pampered, middle-class sycophant launched onto the national stage because of the sexual preference he only recently became comfortable with. In this publication I called him a GINO, Gay In Name Only. Take all that combined with his zero support from black voters and media darling Pete never had a chance. ‘The only thing that distinguishes the mayor of South Bend from all those other well-educated reasonably intelligent white dude who wanna be president is what he does with his dick (and possibly his ass, although I get a definite top-by-default vibe from him, which is to say that I bet he thinks about getting fucked but he’s too uptight to do it.),’ Peck wrote. Funny enough, I said the exact thing to a friend the other day who called Pete ‘a bottom.’ Peck also repeated my take that Pete’s weird, recent coming out story speaks lowly of his character and that it leads me to believe he can’t be trusted. Peck expanded, calling the mayor a ‘gay teenager.’ ‘We all know what happens when gay people don’t get a real adolescence because they spent theirs in the closet: they go through it after they come out… the last thing I want in the White House is a gay man staring down 40 who suddenly realizes he didn’t get to have all the fun his straight peers did when they were teenagers,’ he wrote, later identifying Pete with a ‘gay parody of heteronormative bourgeois domesticity.’ Peck was right and therefore he had to die. Outraged liberals bombarded the magazine with complaints and hours later the story was removed from the site, replaced by an editorial note calling the story ‘inappropriate and invasive’ and expressing ‘regret’ over its publication. I can’t stop laughing. Some were even calling for the scalp of an editor, just to make sure they got the message. The worst kept secret in American politics is the party that once pretended to stand for free speech, liberty, and tolerance has absolutely no room for such things today. The young AOC-colytes are as keen to snuff out any freethinking gadabout in their ranks who remembers life before Will & Grace as they are to imprison Trump supporters. What remains are gays like Yashar Ali, some sort of blogger famous for being turned on by cute elephant videos, who called the New Republic story a ‘disgrace’ and would have rather choked on his own butt plug than actually link to the unclean and blasphemous words of Mr Peck. Of course, there’s nothing disgraceful about what Peck wrote. He’s a socialist gay writer, one who actually lived through the ACT UP years and probably saw many people die. He’s criticizing a gay presidential candidate’s inflated gay cred and that candidate’s commitment to Resistance dogma – emphasizing the far-left direction this writer clearly wants to see his party move towards. The only disgrace here is the left’s intolerance for outliers and the cruelty it bestows on such people. And the other disgrace here is how we’ve let 25-year-old eunuchs and schoolmarms become the gatekeepers of gayness, as they happily toss their history and elders aside to embrace the trendy authoritarianism that gives such talentless social justice warriors purpose and comfort. I’d call them all a bunch of whiny bottoms but I’m not sure any of them actually have anuses. Straight people killed gay culture by elevating these people into positions of power because, like Mayor Pete, they are insufferably safe, family-friendly psuedo-gays, who will tow the party line and have managed to achieve complete sexlessness. No one at the office is ever going to look at gay Daily News writer Alaric DeArment and speculate with morbid curiosity what depraved shit he got up to over weekend. Take one look at him and you know the answer: he probably admired his stamp collection for a few hours then watched Stranger Things alone with his cat before crying himself to sleep, just like every night. And that’s how neoliberals and the establishment want their gays, dutiful and nonthreatening. That’s why they will always sacrifice Peck for Pete. Gays were once natural libertarians. They wanted nothing more than to be left alone by their neighbors and the government. That’s what the gay rights movement was about, it was socially libertarian. In fact, the oldest continually running gay group in the world is a Republican organization in Los Angeles. When lesbians and Marxists took over the movement that gay men built and perverted it into this grotesquery before us today, a tyranny of mediocrity led by people like Vox’s own prêt-à-porter lispy queer Carlos Maza and soyface Zack Ford of Think Progress came into being. I like my gays a little more fun and messy. Give me an angry, AIDSy cokehead communist who spent the Eighties huffing poppers on his knees in sex dungeons over these milquetoast crybullies any day. At least the commie has some good stories to tell and would punch back before he tattled to teacher. Our great contribution to Western civilization has been our cultural utility, existing on the fringes of society where we were in the best position to hold a mirror up to it. That’s drag culture, or rather it was until Big Gay brought children into it and tiresome art school fags tried to make it avant garde. Drag wasn’t identity politics, it was commentary on sex and the two genders from the unique (and rather sharp) perspective of gay men watching from the sidelines. The best drag today still is that and the reason the art form has endured. Yet, in just over 100 years we’ve gone from Oscar Wilde to Ross Matthews. Sad. Peck wasn’t shy about praising feminism and rebuking capitalism in his essay. He’s a full-on socialist and deployed all the buzzwords worthy of high ridicule, yammering about ‘racist police,’ and ‘white male privilege.’ He and I couldn’t be further opposite in our political beliefs and, yet, as one writer from the left-wing magazine the Stranger put it when I spoke of the Peck dust up on social media, ‘We’ve entered a parallel universe where liberals call for the censorship of libertine homosexuals and conservatives defend them.’
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Pete Buttigieg: If You Use Straws or Eat Burgers, You’re “Part of The Problem”

Postby smix » Fri Sep 06, 2019 6:01 am

Pete Buttigieg: If You Use Straws or Eat Burgers, You’re “Part of The Problem”
Infowars

URL: https://www.infowars.com/pete-buttigieg ... e-problem/
Category: Politics
Published: September 5, 2019

Description: Dem presidential hopeful guilt trips millions of Americans

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In an interview with CNN’s Alisyn Camerota on Thursday, Democrat presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg criticized Americans who use straws or eat hamburgers, saying they’re “part of the problem.”



In the beginning of the video, Camerota claimed she hasn’t used a plastic straw in six months because she’s “so worried about what’s happening in the ocean.”

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She then asked Buttigieg what people can do to not feel so helpless in the face of something so existential. “It’s not only about all of the things we’ve got to do technologically and with regulation and so on, it’s about summoning the energies of this country to do something unbelievably hard,” he replied. By saying we’ve got to use regulations to battle climate change, Mayor Pete is admitting he’d use government mandates to go after plastic straw users and meat-eaters.

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Continuing, Buttigieg said, “See, right now, we’re in a mode where I think we’re thinking about it mostly through the perspective of guilt. You know, from using a straw, to eating a burger, ‘am I part of the problem?’ and in a certain way, yes, but the most exciting thing is that we can all be part of the solution.” So, he says Americans are viewing the issue of climate change “through the perspective of guilt,” and then tells people who eat burgers and use straws they’re “a part of the problem” in the next sentence. This is one more example of Democrat politicians putting Americans through a guilt trip in order to further their political agenda.

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For example, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has shamed New Yorkers for eating too many hot dogs and vows to reduce the city’s processed meat consumption.
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Jet-setter: Buttigieg leads 2020 Dems in private flights

Postby smix » Wed Sep 11, 2019 3:22 pm

Jet-setter: Buttigieg leads 2020 Dems in private flights
AP

URL: https://www.apnews.com/a5f265845756449f9f093e53cf8bef47
Category: Politics
Published: July 25, 2019

Description: WASHINGTON (AP) — Pete Buttigieg has spent roughly $300,000 on private jet travel this year, more than any other Democrat running for the White House, according to an analysis of campaign finance data. The expenditures have enabled the South Bend, Indiana, mayor to keep up an aggressive schedule, shuttling from his campaign headquarters in his hometown to fundraisers and political events across the country. But his reliance on charter flights contrasts sharply with his image as a Rust Belt mayor who embodies frugality and Midwestern modesty.

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That could prove to be a liability in a contest in which relatability to everyday people is often key. “It’s a trade-off. The downside is that taking a private airplane can look very elitist,” said Dan Schnur, a University of Southern California political science professor and former press secretary for John McCain’s 2000 Republican presidential campaign. “On the other hand, it allows you to cover a lot more ground and talk to a much larger number of voters.” Buttigieg’s campaign says the distance between its South Bend headquarters and major airports sometimes makes private jet travel necessary. “We are careful with how we spend our money, and we fly commercial as often as possible,” Buttigieg spokesman Chris Meagher said Wednesday. “We only fly noncommercial when the schedule dictates.” The spending could come up during the Democratic debates next week when Buttigieg shares a stage with Beto O’Rourke , who already took an apparent poke at him over the matter. “No private planes for this campaign,” the former Texas congressman said in a video posted to social media on Monday that was filmed while O’Rourke was aboard a commercial plane waiting for takeoff. “We’re putting your $5, $10, $15 to use and making sure we make the most out of every penny that’s committed to this campaign.” Few political observers predicted Buttigieg would be a leading contender when he entered the 2020 race this year. But he used breakout town hall performances, viral moments and his biography as a millennial, a gay military veteran and a former Rhodes scholar to catapult into the vanguard of Democratic candidates. He led the field of Democratic candidates in fundraising during the second quarter, raking in $24.8 million . Yet the charter flight expenses were only part of a number of large expenditures on travel and accommodation by Buttigieg in recent months. His campaign spent about $110,000 at a Hilton hotel in downtown Miami during the first round of Democratic debates last month . Buttigieg’s campaign says the expenditures covered a large block of conference rooms and rooms for campaign staff, though records show it’s drastically more than any other top contender paid for lodging that week. He also spent about $20,000 at other Hilton hotels, $14,000 on car and limousine services and $4,100 at the Avalon in Beverly Hills, which bills itself as a hotel that “sets the tone for hip repose.” So far, the rate at which he is spending money is far less than most of the other candidates in the sprawling field. His campaign’s “burn rate” was about 35% of what it raised during the second quarter, records show. When it comes to charter flight expenses, Buttigieg is followed by former Vice President Joe Biden, who spent $256,000, according to records. Biden’s campaign declined to discuss his use of charter flights in detail but said carbon offsets purchased to reduce environmental damage from combusted jet fuel contributed to the high cost. The other top contenders spent far less. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has spent about $60,000 on private planes but regularly flies coach and often takes selfies with supporters in airports. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders spent about $18,000. And California Sen. Kamala Harris spent $17,000 on charters, records show. “It’s never been that big of an issue for candidates in the past, except in those cases where the planes are funded by special interests,” said Schnur, the former McCain press secretary, who no longer identifies as a Republican. “But in this environment, where big-dollar fundraising is a highly sensitive issue, it could become fodder for another campaign.”
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