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Oklahoma Police Show up at 5-Year-Old's Birthday Party—and Shoot His Dog in the Head

Oklahoma Police Show up at 5-Year-Old's Birthday Party—and Shoot His Dog in the Head

Postby smix » Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:13 pm

Oklahoma Police Show up at 5-Year-Old's Birthday Party—and Shoot His Dog in the Head
Alternet

URL: http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties ... r-olds-dog
Category: Police
Published: July 20, 2016

Description: The boy said that he wishes someone from the Wynnewood Police would at least apologize for killing his friend.

opie-youngblood.jpg

A family in Wynnewood, Oklahoma says that police mistakenly killed their dog during their 5-year-old son’s birthday party. According to Oklahoma City’s Fox 25 News, an officer whose identity the Wynnewood Police Department has declined to reveal fired a high-powered rifle through a fence and killed the Malone family’s 3-year-old American bulldog and pit bull mix, Opie. Vickie Malone said that she had sent her son Eli and his friends outside so she could prepare ice cream and birthday cake for Eli’s birthday party when she heard a bang. Eli called out to her, “There’s something wrong with Opie.” The adults at the party heard two more shots and ran outside. They found the dog lying on his side inside the fence, “kicking and gasping for air,” said Vickie Malone. The officer who shot the dog told the family that the dog had lunged at him through the fence. Wynnewood Police Chief Ken Moore stood behind the officer’s actions, saying the dog was vicious and had come around the corner of the house outside the fence and charged at the officer. However, Fox 25 said that the video from the scene of the incident they reviewed contradicts the officer’s story. Opie’s body is lying inside the fence with a gunshot wound to the head. The officer who shot the dog had come to the Malone home to serve a warrant to a person who lived there 10 years ago. The warrant, he said, gave him the right to enter private property and take whatever action he deemed appropriate under the circumstances. The Malone family says they never saw any warrant. Chief Moore said that the police department was aware that the Malone family had been in the house for a year and that the officer had been advised that the address was a rental property through which people had “moved in and out” over the years. “I respect what the police do, but this was senseless, but he didn’t show any remorse and didn’t even act like he was sorry or anything,” Vickie Malone said to Fox 25. Eli Malone told reporters that he misses his dog. The 5-year-old said that he wishes someone from the Wynnewood Police would at least apologize for killing his friend. The family have marked Opie’s grave with a small wooden cross.
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Police Kill Nearly 25 Dogs Each Day

Postby smix » Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:26 pm

Police Kill Nearly 25 Dogs Each Day
The Nation

URL: https://www.thenation.com/article/polic ... -each-day/
Category: Police
Published: July 5, 2016

Description: Law enforcement’s treatment of dogs is just a symptom of the militarized policing so many of our neighborhoods are subjected to.



In December 2006, 12-year-old K. Harris was in the backyard of her Hartford, Connecticut, home. She was spending some time with her best friend: her dog, Seven, a St. Bernard. Then two police officers entered the property without a warrant. They were investigating what turned out to be an erroneous tip about guns in an abandoned car on the property (no car, no guns). The officers marched alongside the house to the backyard, and when Seven saw the officers, he took off after them. The officers bolted to the front of the house, just as K., not knowing what was happening, rushed off around the other side of the house to cut off Seven’s path, afraid he would end up in the street. One officer ran clear off the property, but the other, for whatever reason, felt it was necessary to turn and shoot the dog—not just once, but several times. K. heard the shots as she was running to the front of the house. When she got there, the officer stood over the immobilized and whimpering dog. K. pleaded with him not to shoot again. But after the fatal bullet was delivered, the police officer turned to K. and said simply, “I’m sorry, ma’am. Your dog is not going to make it.” Surprisingly, this story is not an aberration. The death of Seven is just one example of an increasingly common phenomenon known as “puppycide”—the killing of pet dogs by law enforcement. The Department of Justice estimates that nearly 25 dogs are killed by law enforcement every day in the United States, which makes a total of 10,000 per year. The circumstances of each encounter are different, as are the breeds of dog, from Labrador retrievers to pit bulls to Chihuahuas. But the stories are woven with common threads—the rush to violence, abuse of power, fear, and carelessness. The treatment that the Harrises, an African-American family whose home was in the heavily policed Northeast neighborhood of Hartford, received at the hands of the officers is also a reflection of law enforcement’s behavior in communities of color across the country. Certainly, there are encounters involving genuinely dangerous dogs, but the scale of this phenomenon seems to speak to larger problems in law enforcement. While the death of a dog can be heartbreaking and life-altering for many people—as it was for K. and the Harris family—it does not compare to the death of a person, to the very real and tragic deaths occurring at the hands of police all over this country. I did not make this video to equate the two acts. Rather, as Just a Dog illustrates, puppycide is yet another symptom of the much larger and devastating national malady of wanton police violence. It is a further tear in the fragile trust between civilians and the people we count on to keep us safe. And it is yet more evidence that our increasingly militarized police forces—tricked out in SWAT gear, tensed in a perpetual state of war—are so many decades and policies away from what policing ought to be. As Radley Balko, a leading voice on the militarization of the police, has noted: In too much of policing today, officer safety has become the highest priority. It trumps the rights and safety of suspects. It trumps the rights and safety of bystanders. It’s so important, in fact, that an officer’s subjective fear of a minor wound from a dog bite is enough to justify using potentially lethal force… But this video is about more than just police militarization and violence. At its core, Just a Dog is the story of a father’s love for his daughter, and the sense of responsibility engendered by that love. When Seven was killed, K. was devastated—depressed, suicidal, haunted by PTSD. Her father, Glen Harris, was her rock. Not only did he care for her physically and emotionally, but he set out on a bold legal course to unleash the power of the law. He sued the town and the police for infringement of their Fourth Amendment rights against illegal search and seizure (pets are considered chattel, or property, and there is no recourse beyond small-damages claims). Glen has put his savings on the line to pursue justice in the name of his daughter and his dog, in a time and place where justice is in short supply. Police forces across the country, in municipalities large and small—from Texas to Ohio to Colorado—have begun to take steps to train officers in canine encounters. This is commendable and necessary; a trend that I hope continues to spread. If postal workers can handle daily confrontations with dogs without resorting to lethal force, surely police officers can learn alternative tactics as well. It’s also important to note that not all police officers are as quick to violence as others—certainly there are compassionate, responsible cops out there. But training and personal variations aside, as trends like puppycide, along with the surge in media attention to police killings of unarmed African Americans have demonstrated, we must look deeper into the tangled soul of American policing, to root out the ills that are plaguing it from within.
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Programmed to Kill: The Growing Epidemic of Cops Shooting Dogs

Postby smix » Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:36 pm

Programmed to Kill: The Growing Epidemic of Cops Shooting Dogs
Huffington Post

URL: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-w-wh ... 34362.html
Category: Police
Published: July 8, 2016

Description: Almost two years after the firestorm that took place in Ferguson, Missouri, when a white police officer shot an unarmed black teenager and militarized police descended in a brutal show of force to quell local protests, not much has really changed for the better. Unarmed Americans are still getting shot by police with alarming regularity. SWAT teams are still bursting through doors, terrorizing families and leaving lives and property shattered. And the military industrial complex is still making a killing (literally and figuratively) at taxpayer expense from the transformation of small-town police forces into extensions of the military. What has changed is the extent to which Americans—easily distracted by all of the political mumbo jumbo being bantered around—seem to have stopped paying attention or being outraged about revelations of government corruption, wrongdoing and outright abuse. Part of this ignorance can be attributed to the failure of the mainstream media to report on what’s really taking place in the American police state. Another part of this apathy can be chalked up to a widespread desensitization to police violence, thanks to the growing availability and accessibility of surveillance and camera footage. As Salon points out, “the increased visibility of trauma and death at the hands of cops” has resulted in “the deadening of our collective senses.” And yet another part of this indifference seemingly stems from the fact that we just don’t value human life as much as we should. How many Americans seem unconcerned about the carnage inflicted on civilians worldwide as a result of the nation’s bloody, endless wars abroad? If there’s one area where Americans do seem to still get outraged, it’s in relation to their pets, who occupy a sizeable place in their hearts, homes and wallets. According to newspaper editors, “stories about animal abuse often generate more responses from upset readers than articles about violence directed toward humans.” Reports from police agencies support the claim that “shooting a dog brings more heat down on an agency than an officer-involved shooting of a human.” Prepare to be outraged. A dog is shot by a police officer “every 98 minutes.” The Department of Justice estimates that at least 25 dogs are killed by police every day. The Puppycide Database Project estimates the number of dogs being killed by police to be closer to 500 dogs a day (which translates to 182,000 dogs a year). Because not all police departments keep track of canine shootings, these numbers vary widely. However, whatever the final body count, what we’re dealing with is an epidemic of vast proportions. The so-called “dangerous” breeds of dogs aren’t the only ones that are being killed in encounters with police either. Essentially, police can shoot your dog for any reason or no reason at all. What’s more, the general consensus from the courts thus far has been to absolve police from charges of wrongdoing. Outraged yet? Not to worry. I’m just getting warmed up. Spike, a 70-pound pit bull, was shot by NYPD police when they encountered him in the hallway of an apartment building in the Bronx. Surveillance footage shows the dog, tail wagging, right before an officer shot him in the head at pointblank range. Arzy, a 14-month-old Newfoundland, Labrador and golden retriever mix, was shot between the eyes by a Louisiana police officer. The dog had been secured on a four-foot leash at the time he was shot. An independent witness testified that the dog never gave the officer any provocation to shoot him. Seven, a St. Bernard, was shot repeatedly by Connecticut police in the presence of the dog’s 12-year-old owner. Police, investigating an erroneous tip, had entered the property—without a warrant—where the dog and her owner had been playing in the backyard, causing the dog to give chase. Dutchess, a 2-year-old rescue dog, was shot three times in the head by Florida police as she ran out her front door. The officer had been approaching the house to inform the residents that their car door was open when the dog bounded out to greet him. Yanna, a 10-year-old boxer, was shot three times by Georgia police after they mistakenly entered the wrong home and opened fire, killing the dog, shooting the homeowner in the leg and wounding an investigating officer. Payton, a 7-year-old black Labrador retriever, and 4-year-old Chase, also a black Lab, were shot and killed after a SWAT team mistakenly raided the mayor’s home while searching for drugs. Police shot Payton four times. Chase was shot twice, once from behind as he ran away. Mayor Cheye Calvo was handcuffed and interrogated for hours—wearing only underwear and socks—surrounded by the dogs’ carcasses and pools of the dogs’ blood. In another instance, a Missouri SWAT team raided a family home, killing a 4-year-old pit bull Kiya. Believe it or not, this time the SWAT raid wasn’t in pursuit of drugs, mistaken or otherwise, but was intended “to check if [the] home had electricity and natural gas service.” These are not isolated instances. We’re dealing with an outright epidemic. Clearly, our four-legged friends are suffering at the hands of a police state in which the police have all the rights and the citizenry (and their “civilian” dogs) have little to none. As always, we have to dig down deep to understand why is this happening. Are family dogs really such a menace to police? Are law enforcement agents really so fearful for their safety—and so badly trained—that they have no recourse when they encounter a dog than to shoot? Finally, are police shootings of dogs really any different than police shootings of unarmed citizens? First off, dogs are no greater menace to police than they are to anyone else. After all, as the Washington Post points out, while “postal workers regularly encounter both vicious and gregarious dogs on their daily rounds... letter carriers don’t kill dogs, even though they are bitten by the thousands every year. Instead, the Postal Service offers its employees training on how to avoid bites.” Second, these dog shootings epitomize a larger, societal problem with law enforcement agencies prioritizing an “officer safety” mindset that encourages police to shoot first and ask questions later. We’d have a lot fewer police shootings (of dogs and unarmed citizens) if police weren’t quite so preoccupied with “officer safety” at the expense of all else. Third, these dog killings are, as Balko recognizes, “a side effect of the new SWAT, paramilitary focus in many police departments, which has supplanted the idea of being an ‘officer of the peace.’” Thus, whether you’re talking about police shooting dogs or citizens, the mindset is the same: a rush to violence, abuse of power, fear for officer safety, poor training in how to de-escalate a situation, and general carelessness. That paramilitary focus has resulted in a government mindset that allows SWAT teams and other government agents to invade your home, break down your doors, kill your dog (the dog always gets shot first), wound or kill you, damage your furnishings and terrorize your family. This is the same mindset that sees nothing wrong with American citizens being subjected to roadside strip searches, forcible blood draws, invasive surveillance, questionable exposure to radiation and secret government experiments, and other morally reprehensible tactics. Unfortunately, this is a mindset that is flourishing within the corporate-controlled, military-driven American police state. So what’s to be done about all of this? In terms of our four-legged friends, many states are adopting laws to make canine training mandatory for police officers. Frankly, police should also be made to undergo classes annually on how to peacefully resolve and de-escalate situations with the citizenry. While they’re at it, they should be forced to de-militarize. No one outside the battlefield—and barring a foreign invasion, the U.S. should never be considered a domestic battlefield—should be equipped with the kinds of weapons and gear being worn and used by local police forces today. If the politicians are serious about instituting far-reaching gun control measures, let them start by taking the guns and SWAT teams away from the countless civilian agencies that have nothing to do with military defense that are packing lethal heat. Finally, there will be no end to the bloodshed—of unarmed Americans or their family pets—until police stop viewing themselves as superior to those whom they are supposed to serve and start acting like the peace officers they’re supposed to be. Ultimately, this comes down to better—and constant—training in nonviolent tactics, serious consequences for those who engage in excessive force, and a seismic shift in how the law enforcement agencies and the courts deal with those who transgress. As I point out in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, when you’re trained to kill anything that poses the slightest threat (imagined or real), when you’ve been instructed to view yourself as a soldier and those you’re supposed to serve as enemy combatants on a battlefield, when you can kill and there are no legal consequences for your actions, and when you are deemed immune from lawsuits holding you accountable for the use of excessive force, then it won’t matter what gets in your way. Whether it’s a family pet, a child with a toy gun, or an old man with a cane—you’re going to shoot to kill.
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Police can shoot your dog for no reason. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Postby smix » Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:56 pm

Police can shoot your dog for no reason. It doesn’t have to be that way.
The Washington Post

URL: https://www.washingtonpost.com/postever ... -that-way/
Category: Police
Published: November 15, 2015

Description: Training could go a long way to reducing these senseless animal deaths.



Dutchess, a 2-year-old rescue dog belonging to a family in Florida City, Fla., had always been affectionate and curious. So on a recent Tuesday, when a police officer approached the home to notify the family that their car door was open, she naturally bounded out to greet him. In a moment captured by disturbing surveillance footage, as Dutchess came toward the officer, he instinctively fired three gunshots into her head. Before they even knew why the officer was there, the family was watching Dutchess bleed to death a few feet from their front door. Dutchess’s owners are still grieving the loss of their dog, who used to sleep in bed with their 8-year-old son, and are stunned by the turn of events. “All she would have done was put some slobber on his shoes,” says Gillian Palacios. But the Florida officer’s reaction was not an unusual one — dogs are killed by police on a regular basis. There’s no official tally of how many dogs are killed each year by police officers. (Not particularly surprising, given how hard it is to obtain an accurate count of humans police kill annually.) But traumatized owners, furious about the killing of their pets, and organizations have created their own counts. There are Web pages dedicated to compiling accounts of the killings, along with the dogs’ pictures and names. Informal tracking sites run by activists and researchers, such as the Puppycide Database Project, collect news articles, court documents and police reports in an attempt to produce sound data. On an interactive “puppycide” map, users can plot incidents from around the country. Research by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals suggests that half of all police firearm discharges involve the shooting of a dog. In Buffalo, local news channel WGRZ conducted an in-depth investigation of the city’s practices, concluding that police shot 92 dogs in a three-year period, with a single officer responsible for 26 shootings. A similar investigation in Atlanta found 100 deaths in two years. But often, the only data available is in the form of scattered news reports. Dog killings are frequent enough that a Justice Department official has called them “an epidemic.” The Animal Legal Defense Fund has put out guidelines on how to keep your dog from being killed by police officers. “Do not leave your dog outside unattended,” it warns, as if any unwatched moment could mean a dog’s death at the hands of police. Not every dog killing means an officer acted wrongly or maliciously, and officers may be justified in using force against a dog. Many of the shootings occur when police attempt to control dogs that are reported to be dangerous or to have attacked someone. Making sudden movements can cause officers to reflexively reach for a weapon, and dogs greeting strangers are just about the most erratic and sudden movers of all. Officers have been knocked down and bitten by dogs they were called in to help control. About a dozen dog-bite fatalities occur every year, with most of the victims children and the elderly. Dogs can pose a real threat. Yet killing isn’t necessarily the only option. After all, just like police officers, postal workers regularly encounter both vicious and gregarious dogs on their daily rounds. But letter carriers don’t kill dogs, even though they are bitten by the thousands every year. Instead, the Postal Service offers its employees training on how to avoid bites. (In addition, the agency keeps a centralized database of dog bites, a marked contrast to the lack of data on police killings.) At the sessions, handlers put postal workers through sample scenarios using live dogs, teaching them how to calm a dog, distract a dog and even fend one off if necessary. Similar training for meter readers has massively reduced instances of bites. Trainers say that in many cases, officers simply have no idea how to read a dog’s body language. Dog behavior counselor Brian Kilcommons, who helped produce the Justice Department’s training videos on police encounters with dogs, says officers’ inclination to “take command and take control” can cause them to antagonize dogs unnecessarily. “What they term as aggression is usually fear,” Kilcommons says. Officers “need to realize they’re there to neutralize, not control.” He adds: “If they have enough money to militarize the police with Humvees, they have enough money to train them not to kill family members. And pets are considered family.” Even when they occur, dog bites are rarely a serious enough threat for lethal force to be a sensible response. According to the Officer Down Memorial Page, a national database of law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty, 15 deaths in the past 70 years have been animal-related, but none of them involved a dog attack. (Almost all involved horses or insect stings.) One would expect, then, that there would be very little need to use a firearm. Yet it happens all the time: Sometimes dogs are killed when police enter a house to seize drugs, but just as often it seems they die when officers have the wrong information entirely. In July, police in Topeka, Kan., killed the dog of a retired judge when they entered his back yard on a false burglary call, and in 2008 Maryland police notoriously raided a mayor’s house and killed his dogs, on the mistaken belief that he was part of a drug ring. In the aftermath of that incident, the state mandated that SWAT teams report to the governor any pets injured or killed during raids. Prince George’s County initiated several police reforms and entered a settlement with the mayor. But the Sheriff’s Office defended its actions at the time, saying the officers had “apparently felt threatened” by the dogs. “We’re not in the habit of going to homes and shooting people’s dogs,” a spokesman said. “If we were, there would be a lot more dead dogs around the county.” But there are a lot of dead dogs around the country. In March, a San Diego man saw police kill his service dog, Burberry, who helped him deal with depression after the death of his father. In Nebraska, owners mourned after the police shooting in August of a gentle border collie mix named Todd who lived among chihuahuas and liked to play with neighborhood children. Some of the stories are downright sickening, such as a Baltimore officer who cut a dog’s throat. Last year, a heartbreaking viral video showed Salt Lake City resident Sean Kendall desperately demanding answers from police who had shot his dog, Geist, after entering his yard while searching for a missing child. Kendall remains furious that the officers went onto his property and killed his dog. “The loss of Geist has completely changed my life,” Kendall says. “Geist was my best friend, and we had at least 10 more years together.” Perhaps dog killings should be analyzed in the context of overzealous, militarized policing, in which force has become the default option for dealing with almost any situation. As Radley Balko wrote in the Daily Beast in 2009, killing dogs may be “a side effect of the new SWAT, paramilitary focus in many police departments, which has supplanted the idea of being an ‘officer of the peace.’ ” (The shooting of a family’s dog can seem an almost standard measure in SWAT raids.) Of course, one must be very careful in discussing the killing of dogs, to avoid stealing attention from the greater problem of police wrongfully killing humans. It’s very disturbing that, according to the law enforcement magazine Police, “shooting a dog brings more heat down on an agency than an officer-involved shooting of a human.” The fact remains, however, that dog killings are a problem, one that brings lot of unnecessary pain to families and their pets. And it might be possible to do something about it. A number of efforts are afoot to curb police shootings of dogs. The National Canine Research Council has been advocating alternatives to lethal force and produced a series of training videos for police. In 2013, Colorado passed the Dog Protection Act, which requires the implementation of protocols for dog encounters; Texas passed a similar measure this year. Activists continue to spread stories far and wide, with a new documentary called “Of Dogs and Men” drawing attention to the problem. Online petitions, such as one calling for the firing of the officer who killed Dutchess in Florida, attempt to bring both awareness and pressure. The available legal remedies are of mixed effectiveness. Some lawsuits against police over dog killings have been successful, such as one brought by the Hell’s Angels against the city of San Jose. In certain cases, courts have held that the killings violated the Fourth Amendment, and owners have collected damages or reached settlements. Often the law is uncertain, though, and procedural barriers vary from state to state. Making a city pay compensation doesn’t necessarily change future police behavior, and it certainly doesn’t return a pet to life. Ultimately, police procedures need to require more restraint when it comes to the taking of life. After all, it’s not that police don’t care about dogs; some dog killings are taken very seriously. For example, a teenager in Florida who fatally shot a trained K-9 dog received a 23-year prison sentence. Police dog funerals can be elaborate affairs, with flag-draped coffins, uniformed processions, open-casket ceremonies and full honors. Police should have the same respect for the beloved pets of others that they afford to their own canine colleagues.
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Northland woman says officers had no reason to shoot, kill her dog

Postby smix » Mon Aug 29, 2016 6:32 am

Northland woman says officers had no reason to shoot, kill her dog
FOX4 KC

URL: http://fox4kc.com/2016/08/02/northland- ... l-her-dog/
Category: Police
Published: August 2, 2016

Description: KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- A northland woman claims that a law enforcement officer shot and killed her dog for no apparent reason. The incident was captured on surveillance video Saturday night, July 30, near Parvin Road and North Cleveland Avenue. Brandee Buschman says the two officers who showed up on her doorstep about 11:30 p.m., never announced who they were. "I saw it was two guys who were a little taller," Buschman said. "One of them was a little heavier, standing there with guns. I saw the flash of the gun. My dog went down, and I went down with my dog."



Surveillance video from Buschman's home shows the officers approaching with guns drawn. As Brandee opens her door, her 13-year-old dog, Sierra, runs out. One of the officers immediately fires at the shelter rescue dog. The first shot did not hit the beloved pet, and the animal turned back toward the house. A second shot was fired. That shot hit and killed Sierra. The video shows Buschman coming out the door and immediately kneeling to the ground to cradle her longtime companion in her arms. "As I opened the door my dog is running toward me," Buschman recalled. "I heard another pop and she’s down on the ground. Bleeding. All I could say was, 'Don’t shoot, don’t shoot!' I remember saying that before the second pop went off and the taller officer was like, 'Oh, too late.'" According to Buschman's boyfriend, who came outside immediately afterwards, one of the officers said he wasn't going to give the dog an opportunity to bite. "Please know most officers are dog owners and it is unfortunate when these incidents occur. Unfortunately, if officers fear being attacked b y a dog they defend themselves from personal injury," said Capt. Stacey Graves, KCMO Police Dept, in an email to FOX 4. "No one wants to see a family pet injured or killed. Officers are put in a difficult position in these situations." But the couple insists that the dog posed no danger. Buschman still doesn't know why officers were at her home. Scott Morrison, Buschman's boyfriend, says an officer told him someone called 911 about hearing breaking glass or some sort of disturbance nearby. But Buschman says there was nothing wrong on her property. The officers left without making any arrests or apologizing for killing a beloved animal that Brandee says has been part of her family for more than 10 years. Kansas City police say they are checking into the incident.
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Federal court rules police can shoot a dog if it moves or barks when officers enter a home

Postby smix » Wed Dec 28, 2016 9:07 pm

Federal court rules police can shoot a dog if it moves or barks when officers enter a home
FOX31 Denver

URL: http://kdvr.com/2016/12/27/federal-cour ... er-a-home/
Category: Legal
Published: December 27, 2016

Description: A police officer can shoot a dog if it barks or moves when the officer enters a home, under a new federal court ruling issued this month. The ruling comes after police in Battle Creek, Michigan, shot two pit bulls while searching a home for evidence of drugs in 2013. The dogs’ owners, Mark and Cheryl Brown, filed a lawsuit against the Battle Creek Police Department and the city, claiming that killing the dogs amounted to the unlawful seizure of property in violation of the Fourth Amendment. The district court sided with the police officers and the Browns filed an appeal with United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The lawsuit states that when officers arrived to conduct the search, Mark Brown told an officer he had a key to the front door and that his two dogs were in the residence. However, another officer testified that he didn’t hear about the comments before police broke down the door. According to the lawsuit, Officer Christof Klein testified that when he entered the house, a large, brown pit bull jumped off the couch, aggressively barked at the officers and lunged at him. Officer Klein stated that the first pit bull “had only moved a few inches” between the time when he entered the residence and when he shot her, but he considered the movement to be a “lunge.” Another officer stated that “the amount of time between the door coming open and the shot was extremely small… maybe a second or less.” Klein stated that after he fire the shot, the dog “moved away from the officers and towards the kitchen, then down the stairs and into the basement.” A smaller, white pit bull had also gone down into the basement. “As the officers were descending the stairs to clear the basement, they noted that the first pit bull was at the bottom of the stairs,” the lawsuit states. “Klein testified that the first pit bull obstructed the path to the basement, and that he ‘did not feel [the officers] could safely clear the basement with those dogs down there.'” “When the officers were halfway down the stairs, the first dog, who was at the bottom of the staircase, turned towards them and started barking again. From the staircase, Officer Klein fired two fatal rounds at the first pit bull,” the lawsuit states. “Klein testified that after he shot and killed the first dog, he noticed the second dog standing about halfway across the basement. The second dog was not moving towards the officers when they discovered her in the basement, but rather she was ‘just standing there’… barking,” the lawsuit continues. Klein fired two rounds at the second dog. After being shot by Officer Klein, the second dog ran to the back corner of the basement. Then a second officer shot her because she was “moving” out of the corner and in his direction, the lawsuit states. The wounded pit bull ran behind the furnace in the back corner of the basement. A third officer noted that “[there] was blood coming out of numerous holes in the dog, and . . . [he] didn’t want to see it suffer” so he shot her again, to “put her out of her misery.” On Dec. 19, the appeals court issued a ruling stating that the officers acted reasonably in the case and the Browns’ constitutional rights were not violated. “The seizures of the dogs in this case were reasonable given the specific circumstances surrounding the raid,” the court ruled. “[It] was reasonable for the officers to force entry because they had information that [a known gang member] used the residence to distribute cocaine and heroin, and they did not know whether gang members would be in the residence armed and ready to fire at the officers,” the ruling states. “[The] officers would not have used the keys Mark Brown offered to give them because the officers would not have had any idea whether those keys were the correct keys. Defendants’ counsel persuasively argued that Mark Brown could have given the officers the wrong set of keys, and the resulting delay could have given somebody in the house the opportunity to destroy the drugs or time to prepare to attack or shoot the officers as they entered the residence,” the ruling states. Judge Eric Clay stated “a police officer’s use of deadly force against a dog while executing a search warrant to search a home for illegal drug activity is reasonable under the Fourth Amendment when… the dog poses an imminent threat to the officer’s safety.” You can read the full court ruling here: http://www.opn.ca6.uscourts.gov/opinion ... 93p-06.pdf
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Police Brutality - Dog Playing in Brooklyn Park Shot and Killed by NYPD

Postby smix » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:14 am

Police Brutality - Dog Playing in Brooklyn Park Shot and Killed by NYPD
The Bark

URL: http://thebark.com/content/police-bruta ... illed-nypd
Category: Police
Published: March 22, 2017

Description: Playing in a Brooklyn park turned to heartbreak when Laura Stephen’s dog Ziggy was shot twice, and killed by NYPD officers. Ziggy a rescued mixed breed was playing off leash in the Saratoga Park in the Bed-Stuy neighborhood of Brooklyn on Sunday as they did every evening. Two officers entered the park, Stephen explained to news outlets that one asked her to leash her dog, and when she called Ziggy he turned towards her and an NYPD officer pulled out his gun and fired two shots. The officer claims that Ziggy lunged at him, and so feeling threatened, he shot the dog. Stephen says Ziggy never lunged, and was more than 10 feet away from the officer on his way back to her when shot. Neighbors told news outlets that Ziggy was very friendly and never aggressive. Stephen didn’t have her wallet or phone so borrowed another parkgoers phone to call her son. When her son arrived with her belongings he rushed to his mother and her dog but was thrown against a tree, and arrested by NYPD officers for disorderly conduct. Meanwhile Ziggy was bleeding surrounded by 30-40 police officers who arrived on the scene. Stephen used snow and her coat to try and stop the bleeding from the gunshot wounds. An hour after being shot NYPD transported Stephen and Ziggy to an emergency veterinary hospital. Despite receiving a blood transfusion Ziggy died. NYPD officials arrived at the veterinary clinic and issued a criminal summons to Stephen for having her dog off leash.
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Cops Ignore ‘Beware of Dog’ Signs, Walk Into Yard, Kill Family’s Dog — For No Reason

Postby smix » Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:06 pm

Cops Ignore ‘Beware of Dog’ Signs, Walk Into Yard, Kill Family’s Dog — For No Reason
The Free Thought Project

URL: http://thefreethoughtproject.com/watch- ... eware-dog/
Category: Police
Published: June 12, 2017

Description: Winter Garden, FL — A dramatic video of a Winter Garden police officer shooting a family’s dogs was shared with the Free Thought Project this week. After shooting the dogs, who appeared to be coming to greet him, the video shows the officer immediately tell a story that clearly did not happen. According to the person who submitted the video, his aunt was visiting his parent’s home in Florida. When she arrived at the home, she accidentally put in the wrong alarm code, but it was cleared within just a few seconds. Despite the alarm being cleared, police showed up 45 minutes later. “Both dogs have never bitten anyone. They were just coming up to say hey,” writes L Chastang, as he describes the officer’s body camera footage. “The three dogs are on electric collars that runs the property line. The beware of dog signs in the front of the entrance and just before entering the courtyard are obvious,” he said. Clearly ignoring the beware of dog signs and the cleared alarm notice, the officers entered the property anyway. When the dogs ran up to greet them, an officer shot. The first part of the body camera video has no sound, so we cannot hear the dog or how many shots are fired. However, we can see the dogs wagging their tails right before they are shot. Also, you can clearly see that both dogs stopped right at the officer’s feet when the got to him. They didn’t jump up or attempt to bite him. It looked like they were just excited to see someone. After shooting the dogs, they run away, leaving behind a trail of blood. The family’s Rottweiler, Bane, did not survive. When the homeowner’s sister comes out after hearing the gunshots, she asks police what happened. “They charged me and backed me into a corner ma’am,” says the officer. “Both of them?” the woman asks. “Three of them,” says the officer, clearly recalling a story that the body camera shows did not happen. The Free Thought Project reached out to the Winter Garden police department for a statement on this incident which allegedly happened on July 3, 2016. However, we have yet to receive a response.

Video URL: https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=e09_1497236548

In the land of the free, police can come onto your private property, lure your dog out of its own fenced in yard, gun him down in broad daylight, and this is called ‘standard procedure.’ Well, it’s a damn good thing that postal workers, delivery truck drivers, pizza delivery drivers — and all the other jobs that require people to go to someone’s home and NOT KILL THEIR DOG — don’t claim the same rights as cops, or family pets would probably be extinct. Sadly, this trend shows no signs of slowing. According to some estimates, as John Whitehead points out, a dog is shot by a police officer “every 98 minutes.” The Department of Justice estimates that at least 25 dogs are killed by police every day. The Puppycide Database Project estimates the number of dogs being killed by police to be closer to 500 dogs a day (which translates to 182,000 dogs a year). Because not all police departments keep track of canine shootings, these numbers vary widely. However, whatever the final body count, what we’re dealing with is an epidemic of vast proportions. Incredibly, in 1 out of 5 cases involving police shooting a family pet, a child was either in the police line of fire or in the immediate area of a shooting. The so-called “dangerous” breeds of dogs aren’t the only ones that are being killed in encounters with police either. Journalist Radley Balko has documented countless “dog shootings in which a police officer said he felt ‘threatened’ and had no choice but to use lethal force, including the killing of a Dalmatian (more than once), a yellow Lab , a springer spaniel, a chocolate Lab, a boxer, an Australian cattle dog, a Wheaten terrier, an Akita… a Jack Russell terrier… a 12-pound miniature dachshund… [and] a five-pound Chihuahua.” To those that think cops killing dogs is not a problem, we encourage you to watch the video below and then take a look through our puppycide archives here.

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Family’s dog shot, killed by deputy serving warrant on neighbor

Postby smix » Thu Jul 27, 2017 7:22 am

Family’s dog shot, killed by deputy serving warrant on neighbor
WYFF News 4 - Greenville, SC

URL: http://www.wyff4.com/article/familys-do ... r/10359331
Category: Police
Published: July 26, 2017

Description: Woman says dog was gentle, ‘wouldn’t hurt a fly’
GREENVILLE COUNTY, S.C. — A Greenville County woman says her heart is broken after she watched her pet dog, Chico, shot several times by a deputy who was serving a search warrant on a neighbor’s house. Marissa Gilliland said her husband was working on a car outside their home on Monday, and when she heard a commotion outside, she went out with Chico, who she says was always by her side. She said Chico was a friendly dog who loved everyone. She said Chico ran over to the deputies in a “friendly way” with no growling or barking, and he would have sniffed them and given them his paw if he had a chance. But she said one of the deputies fired his gun, hitting the 10-month-old dog in the leg, breaking the bone. Gilliland said Chico tried to run back to her, but the deputy fired several more shots, killing the dog. She said two shots missed Chico, but she thinks six shots were fired, most from behind the dog as he ran toward her. She said the shots were fired when the dog was in her yard. Master Deputy Drew Pinciaro said in an emailed statement, “It is not our intent or practice to use deadly force on animals. In this situation, the dog came at the deputy in an aggressive manner while he was serving a search warrant and that is why he shot the dog. Due to the dog being aggressive and unrestrained, that is why he used the level of force he did.” Pinciaro did not provide any details about the shooting from the deputy’s perspective. Gilliland was barely able to speak through tears on Tuesday. “I have never been this hurt in my life,” she said. “Other people say, ‘He is just a dog,’ but he wasn’t. He was my best friend. My everything. He was family.” Gilliland, who does not have children, says she loved Chico like a son. “I can’t take this pain anymore,” she said. “I am hurting so bad. My heart is broken.”
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Shock Video: Police Shoot Dog, Force Owner to Cut Off Its Head

Postby smix » Wed Dec 06, 2017 10:45 am

Shock Video: Police Shoot Dog, Force Owner to Cut Off Its Head
Infowars

URL: https://www.infowars.com/shock-video-po ... -its-head/
Category: Police
Published: December 5, 2017

Description: ‘This was very traumatic for the kids and I’
A Georgia man was ordered last week to cut his own dog’s head off after police shot it dead. Crawford County resident Joe Nathan Goodwin posted videos to Facebook Friday showing an altercation with sheriff’s deputies, who tell him to remove the dog’s head, or face arrest. Goodwin says police showed up and shot his dog after it bit his neighbor. Police then ordered Goodwin to cut the dog’s head off for it be submitted for rabies testing.

dog-head1.jpg

“I’ll tell you what,” one officer says, “I will take you to jail and charge you and we’ll see how much the law…” “Charge me with what?” Goodwin asks. “With what? You’ll make up the charges?” “When I get there I’ll give you the charges,” the officer responds. In one horrific video, Goodwin proceeds to cut the dog’s head as ordered by police. The video showing Goodwin conducting the act was flagged by Facebook for containing “graphic violence or gore,” but it is still available at the following link (viewer discretion strongly advised):



“This was very traumatic for the kids and I,” Goodwin stated. On Facebook, Goodwin said he wanted his story shared because “I just don’t want this to happen again to any other person.” Outraged commenters urged Goodwin to seek a lawyer, with at least one attorney offering legal help. While it’s unclear why the officer initially shot the dog, the Georgia Rabies Control manual indicates an animal’s head should be removed and sent for testing if it is suspected of having rabies, however it does not specify who should perform the procedure, only that protective gear should be worn, and that “Local veterinarians or trained animal control personnel can assist in this removal.” Follow-up posts on Facebook Monday claimed Goodwin had been banned from commenting or posting on the platform for three days with no indication why, as he reported he would be interviewed by CBS affiliate 13WMAZ.
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