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Tarantino joins activists to protest police brutality in NY

Tarantino joins activists to protest police brutality in NY

Postby smix » Tue Apr 19, 2016 6:39 am

Tarantino joins activists to protest police brutality in NY
AP

URL: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/0300a273 ... utality-ny
Category: Politics
Published: October 24, 2015

Description:

quentin-tarantino.jpg

NEW YORK (AP) — Academy Award-winning filmmaker Quentin Tarantino joined hundreds of demonstrators waving signs, shouting through megaphones and marching along the city's streets on Saturday to protest police brutality nationwide. "I'm a human being with a conscience," said Tarantino, who flew in from California for the event. "And if you believe there's murder going on then you need to rise up and stand up against it. I'm here to say I'm on the side of the murdered." The group gathered Saturday in Manhattan's Greenwich Village neighborhood at Washington Square Park before marching about 2 miles along Sixth Avenue. The protesters walked past lines of police officers who had cordoned off a lane of traffic for them. As they moved, those with megaphones shouted stories of the slain as others waved signs with photos of the dead, mostly young black men, and the dates and places of their deaths. The event was the last of three demonstrations the group RiseUpOctober organized in New York this week. Speakers at the protest said they want to bring justice for people killed by police. Temako Williams walked arm in arm with academic and activist Cornel West, one of the organizers. Her son, La-Reko Williams, was killed by police in 2011 in Charlotte, North Carolina. A federal jury ruled that a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer, who did not face criminal charges, had used excessive force, and it awarded her $500,000. But, she said, the money is no substitute for justice. "It wasn't worth the price of my son's life," she said. "It's a wound that won't heal." While police were present all along the protest route, the day was peaceful. No arrests were reported. The protest came at a time of heightened awareness nationwide of the oft-contentious relationship between police officers and the people they serve. New York's mayor and police commissioner have said they're serious about enacting smart reforms to build trust between police and communities. But the protest also was days after a New York police officer, Randolph Holder, was shot to death while chasing a bicycle thief. A suspect has been charged with murder and robbery in the case. The Rev. Al Sharpton dedicated his weekly radio broadcast and rally at his National Action Network headquarters to Holder. Sharpton and others went to the Brooklyn neighborhood where Holder served to lay a wreath and pray for him and his family. Activist Carl Dix, who helped found RiseUpOctober with West, said that while he sympathized with Holder's family the officer's death did not affect the need to hold Saturday's rally as scheduled. "That's not what this is about," Dix said. "This is about all the people who are murdered by the police."
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Quentin Tarantino 'not backing down' from remarks on police brutality

Postby smix » Tue Apr 19, 2016 7:58 am

Quentin Tarantino 'not backing down' from remarks on police brutality
Los Angeles Times

URL: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/en ... story.html
Category: Politics
Published: November 3, 2015

Description: Under increasing fire from law enforcement groups, director Quentin Tarantino broke his silence Tuesday and said his remarks condemning police brutality had been misrepresented to “demonize” him and deflect attention away from the issue. “All cops are not murderers,” Tarantino told The Times in his first public response to the controversy. “I never said that. I never even implied that.” Police unions across the country, including ones representing officers in Los Angeles and Orange County, have called for a boycott of Tarantino’s upcoming movie, “The Hateful Eight,” following remarks the filmmaker made at an Oct. 24 rally in New York to call attention to those killed in police shootings. “I’m a human being with a conscience,” Tarantino said at the rally. “And when I see murder I cannot stand by. And I have to call the murdered the murdered and I have to call the murderers the murderers.” The threatened boycott could dim prospects for Tarantino’s new film, which is set for a Christmas release and has been expected to be a critical and commercial success for Tarantino and his longtime distributor, the Weinstein Co. Several movies beset by controversy in recent years have seen either their box office or awards recognition dented. Tarantino said his remarks at the rally last month were aimed at police officers who have been involved in unwarranted shootings of civilians. “What they’re doing is pretty obvious,” he said of his critics. “Instead of dealing with the incidents of police brutality that those people were bringing up, instead of examining the problem of police brutality in this country, better they single me out. And their message is very clear. It’s to shut me down. It’s to discredit me. It is to intimidate me. It is to shut my mouth, and even more important than that, it is to send a message out to any other prominent person that might feel the need to join that side of the argument.” Speaking to reporters Tuesday, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said the director “doesn’t understand the nature of the violence” that police officers face in their work. “Mr. Tarantino lives in a fantasy world. That’s how he makes his living,” Beck said. “His movies are extremely violent, but he doesn’t understand violence. … Unfortunately, he mistakes lawful use of force for murder, and it’s not.” The timing of the boycott call comes at a crucial time for Tarantino and Weinstein Co. co-chairman Harvey Weinstein. Over the years, Weinstein has relied on the commercial success of Tarantino’s films, which have included “Pulp Fiction,” “Inglourious Basterds” and “Django Unchained,” to bankroll the production, acquisition and marketing costs of the rest of his slate. “My first company, Miramax, was the house that Quentin built, and my second company, the Weinstein Co., is the house that Quentin saved,” Weinstein said at a 2013 Tarantino tribute in Lyon, France. But the old showbiz adage — that any publicity is good publicity — doesn’t always prove true when it comes to films. “Zero Dark Thirty,” the 2012 movie about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, grossed $95 million in theaters but underperformed at the Oscars after politicians and pundits criticized its depiction of torture. Last year, the civil rights drama “Selma” took hits over its portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson. And in the last few weeks, the biopic “Steve Jobs” has tanked commercially amid complaints from the Apple co-founder’s colleagues that the movie took extreme liberties with its subject. At the same time, films such as “American Sniper” and “The Last Temptation of Christ” were possibly helped by controversy surrounding their takes on events. What’s different here is that the fuss surrounding “The Hateful Eight” isn’t about the content of the movie, which hasn’t been screened publicly, but about remarks made by its director that are unrelated to the film itself. It’s too early to know how many moviegoers will heed the boycott call when “The Hateful Eight” arrives in theaters on Christmas and whether film academy members, who have given Tarantino’s last two movies 13 Oscar nominations, will be inclined to pay attention. Lt. Craig Lally, who heads the Los Angeles Police Protective League that represents LAPD officers, predicts that the broader public will support police and steer clear of “The Hateful Eight.” He says Tarantino showed a “stunning lack of sensitivity” by calling police officers murderers just four days after a New York police officer was killed in East Harlem. “There’s an underground of people who are very pro-police,” Lally said. “And it’s going to be this underground that shuts down the movie, not the cops.” Others see history offering another possible outcome. USC Annenberg professor Jonathan Taplin produced Martin Scorsese’s “Mean Streets” and “The Last Waltz” and remembers the controversy surrounding the filmmaker when religious groups boycotted his 1988 epic “The Last Temptation of Christ.” “The film was really an art film and so all the controversy actually gave it more attention than it might have otherwise gotten,” Taplin said, noting that Scorsese received an Oscar nod for his direction. “The academy does not like being told not to see a movie,” Taplin added. “In Quentin's case, if the movie is good, his fans will come, boycott or not.” Last year, Clint Eastwood’s “American Sniper,” the story of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, the most lethal sniper in U.S. military history, was condemned by many on the left as jingoistic. But it became the year’s highest-grossing film, fueled in part by moviegoers attracted to its empathetic portrait of a military hero. Todd Boyd, a professor of critical studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, believes that the boycott calls could boost interest in “The Hateful Eight” in a similar fashion, piquing the interest of Tarantino’s core group of fans. “Tarantino has always been the kind of figure who has attracted contrarians,” Boyd says. “So there aren’t too many things that could be better for this film than for law enforcement to try and boycott it.” Tarantino, for one, doesn’t believe that the boycott calls will affect his movie. “The people who are screaming against me are the mouthpieces for the police,” Tarantino said. “They can call for a boycott. That doesn’t mean that cops are going to respond. Because I actually have a whole lot of fans that are police officers. “We’ll see what happens,” the filmmaker added. “Maybe it’ll dissipate. Maybe it won’t. But I have a 1st Amendment right to protest against police brutality as I see it. And I’m not backing down from that.”
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Quentin Tarantino Defends Police Brutality Comments

Postby smix » Tue Apr 19, 2016 8:07 am

Quentin Tarantino Defends Police Brutality Comments
Huffington Post

URL: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/que ... 7f2cac1e1c
Category: Politics
Published: November 5, 2015

Description: Quentin Tarantino defended his comments about police brutality during an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on Wednesday. The “Pulp Fiction” director made headlines last month for an appearance at a demonstration against police brutality. “I was under the impression I was an American and that I had First Amendment rights, and there was no problem with me going to an anti-police-brutality protest and speaking my mind,” Tarantino said. “Just because I was at an anti-police-brutality protest doesn’t mean I’m anti-police.” During New York’s RiseUpOctober rally, Tarantino urged the protesters to continue fighting against injustice. “I’m a human being with a conscience,” he said. “If you believe there’s murder going on then you need to rise up and stand up against it. I’m here to say I’m on the side of the murdered.” Tarantino’s remarks drew swift backlash from several police unions, which have called on audiences to boycott his films. He hit back at those critics, telling Hayes that police “would rather start arguments with celebrities than examine the concerns put before them by a citizenry that has lost trust in them.”
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